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Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Apr 2016 at 10:42PM
Kasparov can still play the Scotch, here's his blitz win over Nakamura.

[Event "Ultimate Blitz Challenge"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2016.04.28"]
[EventDate "2016.04.28"]
[Round "5.2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Garry Kasparov"]
[Black "Hikaru Nakamura"]
[ECO "C45"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "97"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Be3 Qf6 6. c3
Nge7 7. Bc4 Ne5 8. Bb3 d6 9. O-O O-O 10. f3 N7c6 11. Kh1 Bb6
12. Na3 Kh8 13. Qd2 Na5 14. Ndb5 Bxe3 15. Qxe3 Qe7 16. Bc2 a6
17. Nd4 c5 18. Ne2 Nac4 19. Nxc4 Nxc4 20. Qc1 f5 21. b3 Nb6
22. c4 fxe4 23. Bxe4 Bf5 24. Ng3 Bxe4 25. Nxe4 Rad8 26. Re1
Rfe8 27. Qd2 Qf8 28. Ng5 Qf6 29. Rxe8+ Rxe8 30. Re1 Rxe1+
31. Qxe1 Nd7 32. Qe8+ Nf8 33. h3 Kg8 34. Ne4 Qf4 35. Qe7 Qc1+
36. Kh2 Qf4+ 37. Kg1 Qc1+ 38. Kf2 Qb2+ 39. Kg3 h5 40. Nxd6 h4+
41. Qxh4 Ng6 42. Qe4 Qf6 43. Nf5 Qg5+ 44. Kh2 Nf4 45. g3 Nh5
46. f4 Qd8 47. Qd5+ Qxd5 48. Ne7+ Kf7 49. Nxd5 1-0

This is one of my favorite variations for White. Kasparov chooses 7 Bc4 instead of the newer 7 Qf3. I play the latter line all the time in blitz online.

Kasparov has defeated Caruana, Nakamura and So and lost to So twice, once to Nakamura and drawn Caruana.

The table with one more day to play:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87292&crosstable=1
     
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by unbeatable on 29 Apr 2016 at 4:29AM
Apparently Garry tried moving a piece twice or some other shenanigans and Nakamura let it slide.
          
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 29 Apr 2016 at 10:35AM
not for the first time
               
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 29 Apr 2016 at 10:36AM
Said Judit.
                    
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 29 Apr 2016 at 4:09PM
Final results:

Hikaru Nakamura: 11/18 (8 wins, 4 losses, 6 draws)
Wesley So: 10/18 (7 wins, 5 losses, 6 draws)
Garry Kasparov: 9.5/18 (6 wins 5 losses, 7 draws)
Fabiano Caruana: 5.5/18 (3 wins, 10 losses, 5 draws)

An impressive performance for the 53 year old Kasparov who has been retired since 2005. He more than held his own against 3 of the top 10 players in the world. Only So gave him problems. Kasparov had one win, 2 draws and 3 losses to So. It's somewhat ironic because Kasparov had said So wasn't quite "ready" for the top competition when he lost to Nakamura's KID several months ago. Kasparov probably would have fared better if he hadn't played King's Indians, Grunfelds and Moderns as Black. He could have been like the World Championship Challenger, Sergey Karjakin who used to play the KID all the time and lost points because of it--and in the Candidates played the safer Queen's Indian. But Kasparov played for blood.

Here's his last game where he squashed Caruana's Reti with aggressive play.

[Event "Ultimate Blitz Challenge"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2016.04.29"]
[EventDate "2016.04.28"]
[Round "18.1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Fabiano Caruana"]
[Black "Garry Kasparov"]
[ECO "A05"]
[WhiteElo "2795"]
[BlackElo "2812"]
[PlyCount "74"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. c4 d6 6. b3 e5
7. Bb2 c5 8. e3 Nc6 9. Nc3 Bf5 10. d4 e4 11. Ne1 Re8 12. Nc2
h5 13. Qd2 h4 14. Ba3 b6 15. Rfd1 Bg4 16. Rdc1 Qd7 17. b4 Qf5
18. Bb2 Rad8 19. Nb5 Bf3 20. d5 Ne5 21. Bxe5 Rxe5 22. Ne1 hxg3
23. fxg3 Bh6 24. Rab1 Kg7 25. Rb3 Qh5 26. h3 Nh7 27. g4 Bxg4
28. hxg4 Qxg4 29. Qd1 Qg3 30. Qe2 Ng5 31. Kh1 Rh8 32. Nxd6 Kg8
33. bxc5 Bf8+ 34. Kg1 Nh3+ 35. Kf1 Bxd6 36. cxd6 Rf5+ 37. Nf3
Rxf3+ 0-1
Chessgi Tournament #2
US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 14 Apr 2016 at 5:09AM
start today
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by JerNYC on 14 Apr 2016 at 10:47AM
Anyone from GT competing?
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 16 Apr 2016 at 4:49AM
So,Caruana,& Robson are leading at 2/2...So vs.Caruana today
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 26 Apr 2016 at 2:57PM
Caruana emerged as champion. Now Kasparov and the top 3 will play a 5min 3 sec delay blitz event. 18 games each player for 50K
Alice Chess
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 11 Apr 2016 at 3:55PM
I was not aware of this variant until I just saw a game posted on the bug board. The variant looks interesting, but I have a couple of questions/clarifications that I feel the rules page does not adequately cover, and hoped people here could. I think, it looks like capturing has to be done on the same board that the piece starts on, but immediately after capturing the piece that did the capture then moves to the other board? Or can you move to a space that's empty on your current board and then capture after the transition?

Moving out of check: If your king is in check on the board that it is starting the move on, to move out of check does the space need to be out of check on both boards, or just the board you will end up on after the move and transition?
     
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Ray of Light  on 11 Apr 2016 at 7:28PM
This is indeed a fun variant. If you wish, send me an invite.

In Alice Chess, all captures may only be executed on the same board as the capturing piece.
Each time that a piece moves it is transported to the other board. This includes captures.
You cannot move to a square that is occupied on the other board. Think of the two boards in the following manner: Take one board and place it on top of the other board so that they are superimposed. No pieces will ever overlap each other.
When the king is in check on one board, it has the option of moving such that it transports itself to the other board, but it cannot fall into check on the other board.
Also, if the king is in check, it cannot move onto an illegal square with impunity knowing that it will be whisked away to possible freedom on the other board. All moves must be legal on the one board before the transport occurs.

Hope that this helps.
          
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 12 Apr 2016 at 12:21PM
Thanks, so for a king to move, the space being moved to must be out of check on both boards. That's what I had assumed, just wasn't sure.
               
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Ray of Light  on 12 Apr 2016 at 12:55PM
Yes, every move must be legal on the board on which the move is being made. The transport happens at the end of all legal moves.
                    
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by rabbitoid  on 12 Apr 2016 at 2:50PM
I always thought the rule was a bit incoherent. Why should a king's move to a square be illegal if he is then no longer there to be taken? Never mind. This is a variant so it can has it's own set of rules, as long as they are well defined and make for an interesting, even chanced and tough variant. Alice chess certainly qualifies, on all counts.
Robert James Fischer...
Posted by unbeatable on 8 Apr 2016 at 9:01AM
is apparently mentioned in the Panama Papers
Karjakin ...
Posted by unbeatable on 8 Apr 2016 at 8:52AM
has withdrawn from this month's event in Norway. Sounds like he is 100% focused on the world championship match in November. The Norway organizers are not pleased.
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:03AM
Especially as he died in 2008!
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:04AM
...Especially as he died in 2008!
          
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:45AM
In July 2008 Karjakin convincingly won a rapid chess match against GM Nigel Short 72.

In February 2009 he won his first elite tournament in the A group of the Corus chess tournament in Wijk aan Zee (category XIX) with a score of 8/13.

July 2012 Karjakin won the World Rapid Chess Championship a full point ahead of world number one Magnus Carlsen in Astana, Kazakhstan.

In March 2014, he finished in second place in the FIDE Candidates Tournament held in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, behind Viswanathan Anand.
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 5:06AM
Sorry about that -I was thinking not of Karjakin but of the previous one, with Robert James Fischer!
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 5:08AM
Sorry about that, I was thinking not about Karjakin, but about the previous reply, to Robert James Fischer.
                    
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Robyn Hode on 9 Apr 2016 at 9:08AM
Robert James Karjakin, the greatest of champeens.
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by JerNYC on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:29PM
Does it strike anyone else odd that chess championships are being played in remote places like Astana, Kazakhstan and Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia? What happened, they couldn't get Mongolia? Granted, if this were the 1800s, those might seem like exciting destinations, but you would think the game's governing body could arrange these tournaments in more tourist-friendly cities that could attract more media coverage.
                    
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Robyn Hode on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:37PM
I think it may have to do with FIDE president Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. Would have been interesting if Kasparov had won the election. More championships in New York, London, etc.
                         
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by JerNYC on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:54PM
Imagine if instead of NYC, Paris, London, and Melbourne, the grand slam of tennis tournaments was held in Pyongyang, Kabul, Mogadishu, and Guam. We would be hearing a lot less about tennis.
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by unbeatable on 13 Apr 2016 at 8:51AM
Apparently Sergey will play Magnus at the upcoming Bilboa/Bilbao event
No fool can play chess...
Posted by unbeatable on 1 Apr 2016 at 5:35AM
but only fools do - german proverb
Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 9:34AM
By defeating Fabiano Caruana with the White pieces.

B67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
1.e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 h6 10. Bh4 b5 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. f5 Qb6 13. fxe6 fxe6 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. Bd3 h5 16. Kb1 b4 17. Ne2 Qc5 18. Rhf1 Bh6 19. Qe1 a5 20. b3 Rg8 21. g3 Ke7 22. Bc4 Be3 23. Rf3 Rg4 24. Qf1 Rf8 25. Nf4 Bxf4 26. Rxf4 a4 27. bxa4 Bxa4 28. Qd3 Bc6 29. Bb3 Rg5 30. e5 Rxe5 31. Rc4 Rd5 32. Qe2 Qb6 33. Rh4 Re5 34. Qd3 Bg2 35. Rd4 d5 36. Qd2 Re4 37. Rxd5 exd5 38. Qxd5 Qc7 39. Qf5 Rf7 40. Bxf7 Qe5 41. Rd7+ Kf8 42. Rd8+ 1-0

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

He will now play World Champion Magnus Carlsen for the title. Youth will be served. The old guard has finally fallen!
     
Re: Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 10:40AM
Conversation on the game has centered on Caruana's 37...Rd5?. Apparently he had a slightly superior position but that move loses. Best may have been 37...Bf3 with an equal position.
          
Re: Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 10:42AM
Check that. 36 ...Re4 when 36 ...Bf3 is equal.
Karjakin vs Caruana
Posted by Robyn Hode on 27 Mar 2016 at 4:42PM
It all comes down to one game tomorrow. Sergey Karjakin, with the White pieces, vs Fabiano Caruana. Both are at 7.5/13. Karjarkin has three wins and Caruana 2. Both have defeated third place Anand 7/13.

Tiebreak criteria:

1. head-to-head results between the tied players
2. number of wins
3. Sonneborn-Berger score
4. rapid/blitz playoffs
Sergey Karjarkin Back on Top at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 5:59PM
After defeating the hapless Veselin Topalov (4 losses) with the Keres Attack vs the Najdorf Sicilian. An unusual game by Karjarkin. Very original.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

[Event "World Championship Candidates"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2016.03.25"]
[EventDate "2016.03.10"]
[Round "12"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Sergey Karjakin"]
[Black "Veselin Topalov"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "2760"]
[BlackElo "2780"]
[PlyCount "69"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 e6
7. g4 Nfd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. g5 b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. h4 O-O 12. Qd2
Nb6 13. h5 N8d7 14. g6 Ne5 15. O-O-O Nbc4 16. Bxc4 Nxc4
17. Qe2 Rc8 18. h6 fxg6 19. Nxe6 Qd7 20. Nxf8 Bxf8 21. hxg7
Bxg7 22. Bd4 a5 23. Bxg7 Qxg7 24. Qg4 Re8 25. Qg5 Bc6 26. Qh6
Qh8 27. b3 Nxa3 28. Rh3 Bd7 29. Rg3 Qf6 30. Rh1 Re7 31. Qh4
Qg7 32. Nd5 Rf7 33. Qd8+ Qf8 34. Qxa5 Nxc2 35. Qc3 1-0
Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Mar 2016 at 2:00PM
The swashbuckling Vishy Anand, 46, after defeating Aronian in a Giuoco Piano, then losing to Caruana in an English Four Knights, ground down co-leader Kajarkin's Berlin Defense in a rook and BOC endgame. He now leads at 6.5/11 with 4 wins. Caruana also is at 6.5/11 with 2 wins but loses on tiebreaks.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?page=2&tid=87151

Anish Giri, following in the footsteps of Peter Leko, has 11 draws in 11 games.
     
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by JohnDerek on 24 Mar 2016 at 11:40PM
Anand would lose on tiebreak to Caruana as he lost game to him.
          
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Mar 2016 at 11:59PM
then losing to Caruana in an English Four Knights

You're right, John. Thanks for the correction. Smiling
               
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by JohnDerek on 25 Mar 2016 at 12:23AM
What happens if there's a 3 way tie ?. A play off ?
                    
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 10:45AM
I'm not sure on that.
     
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by unbeatable on 25 Mar 2016 at 9:29AM
Anand lost today
          
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 10:45AM
That's two English Four Knights he's lost in this tourney.
Down Goes Frazier
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Mar 2016 at 10:17PM
Or Nakamura, who suffered his third loss in the Candidates. At the same time, the Ageless Anand won for the third time and is now tied for first with Karjakin at 5.5/9 after defeating Aronian in a ....Giuoco Piano (!).

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?page=2&tid=87151
Best chance for chess success (imo)...
Posted by unbeatable on 20 Mar 2016 at 10:54AM
is to fully learn and only play one opening
Hou Yifan/Yifan Hou...
Posted by unbeatable on 14 Mar 2016 at 3:18PM
is now 4x world champion !!!!
Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 11 Mar 2016 at 9:02AM
Topalov, Giri, Anand, Nakamura, Caruana, Karjakin, Svidler, and Aronian.

Anand beat Topalov. Caruana and Nakamura drew.


Anand (W)-Topalov (B)

1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. c3 O-O 7. Nbd2 Ne7 8. d4 exd4 9. cxd4 Bb6 10. Re1 Bg4 11. h3 Bh5 12. a4 a6 13. Bf1 Re8 14. a5 Ba7 15. Qb3 Nc6 16. d5 Nd4 17. Nxd4 Bxd4 18. Qxb7 Nd7 19. Nc4 Nc5 20. Qc6 Nb3 21. Rb1 Nxc1 22. Rbxc1 Rb8 23. Qxa6 Qh4 24. Rc2 Rxe4 25. Ne3 Qd8 26. Qc4 Bg6 27. Bd3 Rf4 28. Bxg6 hxg6 29. g3 Re4 30. a6 Qe8 31. Rce2 Bb6 32. Qd3 Ra8 33. Kg2 Qa4 34. b3 Rd4 35. bxa4 Rxd3 36. Nc4 Rxa6 37. a5 Bd4 38. Re8+ Kh7 39. R1e7 Rc3 40. Nd2 Rc2 41. Ne4 f6 42. h4 Rxa5 43. Rf7 g5 44. h5 Rxf2+ 45. Nxf2 Ra2 46. Rff8 Rxf2+ 47. Kh3 g4+ 48. Kxg4 f5+ 49. Rxf5 1-0

Nakamura (W))-Caruana (B)

1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.e3 e6 5.d4 cxd4 6.exd4 Ne7 7.d5
exd5 8.cxd5 d6 9.Nc3 Nd7 10.Nf3 O-O 11.O-O h6 12.h4 Nc5 13.Re1
Bg4 14.Bf4 Nf5 15.Qd2 Bxf3 16.Bxf3 Qf6 17.Rac1 a5 18.Nb5 Qxb2
19.Qxb2 Bxb2 20.Rc2 Bf6 21.Bxd6 Nxd6 22.Nxd6 b6 23.Rb1 Rab8
24.Nc4 Na4 25.Bg4 Rfd8 26.d6 h5 27.Bh3 b5 28.Nxa5 Rxd6 29.Nc6
Rb6 30.Nb4 Nc3 31.Rb3 1/2-1/2
     
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by unbeatable on 12 Mar 2016 at 7:19PM
Nakamura lost today Sad
          
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 12 Mar 2016 at 8:17PM
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

Nak sacs a piece but it doesn't work out. Time trouble also.

[Event "World Championship Candidates"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2016.03.12"]
[EventDate "2016.03.10"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Sergey Karjakin"]
[Black "Hikaru Nakamura"]
[ECO "E15"]
[WhiteElo "2760"]
[BlackElo "2790"]
[PlyCount "75"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7
7. Bg2 d5 8. cxd5 exd5 9. O-O O-O 10. Nc3 Nbd7 11. Qc2 Re8
12. Rfd1 Nf8 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Bc1 Ne6 15. Bb2 Bd6 16. e3 a6
17. Ne2 c5 18. dxc5 Nxc5 19. Nd3 Nce4 20. Rac1 Rc8 21. Qb1 Qe7
22. Bd4 Rxc1 23. Rxc1 b5 24. b4 Nd7 25. a3 Nf8 26. Ba1 Ne6
27. Qa2 Bc7 28. Nd4 Bb6 29. h4 Nxg3 30. fxg3 Nxd4 31. Bxd4
Bxd4 32. exd4 Qe3+ 33. Qf2 Qxd3 34. Rc7 f5 35. Rxb7 h6
36. Bxd5+ Kh7 37. Bg2 Re2 38. Bf1 1-0
     
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by unbeatable on 18 Mar 2016 at 9:03AM
Nakamura will lose 5 to 10 percent of his prize money
          
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by JerNYC on 18 Mar 2016 at 10:47AM
IF GT had earnings leaders, Robyn would need two banks to hold all his winnings. Blinking
               
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:11AM
I'd put my money on Grimsweeper and khayman. Against Grim I've never even had a superior position in any of our games. He's like granite. Against khayman only once have I had a better position. Needless to say I've never beaten either (timeouts don't count) and I've lost several.

If I were to list the best players ever at GT, I'd go with Grim, khayman, chrismiles and bilbo. Several active players, Catalinn, Simpan56 and George1955 are right up there. And we can't forget some early players (back when chessplayers were royalty on GT), like didi.
                    
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by rabbitoid  on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:36AM
I've had the honour of losing to each one of them. And you too Smiling
                         
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:42AM
But you are the best all-around player at GT by far!
                    
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 21 Mar 2016 at 1:41AM
Congrats on becoming the top dog
you didn't include didi, he was on top for a long time
                         
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Mar 2016 at 9:05AM
Thanks Grim. I'm only on top now because you are only playing a few games and khayman timed out on many. I'll be going back down after several draws upcoming.
                              
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 23 Mar 2016 at 6:19PM
I am playing over at gameknot where I have trouble breaking the top 150 Smiling
                                   
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 23 Mar 2016 at 6:44PM
I just suffered a loss to trickyknight in a Grunfeld Tournament. I went down in flames in my favorite Smyslov variation vs the Russian System. I knew I was in trouble in the late middle game and probably should have resigned then. I kept hearing "Pull up! Pull up! Pull up!" in my head as my position nose-dived.

[Event "chess_research's mini-tournament LXXVI"]
[Date "2016.03.19"]
[Round "-"]
[White "trickyknight"]
[Black "lordbyron"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2543"]
[BlackElo "2301"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 Nc6 8. Be2 Nd7 9. Be3 Nb6 10. Qc5 Bg4 11. O-O-O f5 12. h3 Bxf3 13. gxf3 e6 14. h4 f4 15. d5 exd5 16. exd5 Ne5 17. Bd4 Ned7 18. Qa3 Bxd4 19. Rxd4 Nf6 20. Kb1 Nfxd5 21. Nxd5 Nxd5 22. h5 c6 23. hxg6 hxg6 24. Bc4 Qf6 25. Re4 Rfd8 26. Rhe1 b5 27. Bb3 Rd6 28. Qa6 Rad8 29. Qxa7 R8d7 30. Qc5 Kg7 31. a3 Nc7 32. Ka2 Kh6 33. Qc1 Rd2 34. Re5 b4 35. axb4 Na6 36. R5e4 c5 37. b5 Nb4+ 38. Kb1 Qd6 39. Rh1+ Kg7 40. Qc3+ Qf6 41. Rhe1 Qxc3 42. bxc3 Nd5 43. Bxd5 R7xd5 44. R1e2 R2d3 45. b6 Rd8 46. Re8 R8d7 47. Rb8 R3d6 48. Kb2 Rc6 49. Ka3 Rcd6 50. Ka4 Kf6 51. b7 1-0


I managed to draw on the white side only because I played the opening the way he did and when he diverged on move 17 with ...Bxf3 instead of ....Bd5 which his opponent had played against him I was able to get into a rook endgame down a pawn and he offered the draw. I gratefully accepted and fled the building. Smiling

[Event "chess_research's mini-tournament LXXVI"]
[Date "2016.03.22"]
[Round "-"]
[White "lordbyron"]
[Black "trickyknight"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2301"]
[BlackElo "2543"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 a6 8. e5 b5 9. Qb3 Nfd7 10. e6 fxe6 11. Be3 Nf6 12. a4 b4 13. Qxb4 Nc6 14. Qa3 Qd6 15. Bc4 Nb4 16. Qb3 Bb7 17. O-O Bxf3 18. Bxe6+ Kh8 19. gxf3 Rab8 20. Ne4 Nxe4 21. fxe4 Bxd4 22. Bxd4+ Qxd4 23. Rad1 Qxe4 24. Qc3+ Rf6 25. Rfe1 Qf4 26. Kh1 Qxf2 27. Bc4 c6 28. Rxe7 Nd5 29. Bxd5 cxd5 30. Rf7 d4 31. Rxf6 Qxf6 32. Qxd4 Qxd4 33. Rxd4 Rxb2 34. Rd6 Kg7 1/2-1/2
                                        
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 30 Mar 2016 at 9:01AM
here is my most recent game, the Sicilian has been working for me lately.

[Event "Team match"]
[Site "http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?";]
[Date "2016.03.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "blideo23"]
[Black "baseline"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2417"]
[BlackElo "2430"]
[PlyCount "106"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "1/259200:0"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. O-O
O-O 9. Bf3 Qc7 10. Be3 Nc6 11. Qd2 Nxd4 12. Qxd4 e5 13. Qd2 b5 14. Rad1 Bd7 15.
h3 b4 16. Nd5 Nxd5 17. exd5 Bf6 18. fxe5 Bxe5 19. Bd4 Bxd4+ 20. Qxd4 a5 21. Rc1
Qa7 22. Qxa7 Rxa7 23. c3 bxc3 24. Rxc3 Rb8 25. Rf2 g6 26. g4 Kg7 27. Kg2 Rb4
28. Bd1 f5 29. gxf5 Bxf5 30. Bf3 Rh4 31. Rc6 Rd7 32. Ra6 h5 33. Rxa5 Rf7 34.
Ra6 Rxh3 35. Ra4 g5 36. Rd4 Kg6 37. Bd1 Re3 38. Bc2 Bxc2 39. Rxc2 Rfe7 40. Rf2
Re2 41. Kf1 Rxf2+ 42. Kxf2 h4 43. Rb4 Kh5 44. Rb8 Rf7+ 45. Kg2 Kg4 46. Rb3 Rf4
47. Rc3 Rd4 48. Rc1 h3+ 49. Kf2 Rf4+ 50. Ke3 h2 51. a4 Kh3 52. a5 Rf8 53. b4 g4
0-1
                                             
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 1 Apr 2016 at 9:43AM
Well played. He played somewhat passively. 15 h3?! Then the endame. Rooks must be active, and yours were!
1st T chess game won
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 3 Mar 2016 at 3:18AM
Rook on F8 protecting queen on F7 and bishop protecting both squares on F and H 6 #10151168
     
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by JohnDerek on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:05AM
Why did he play 19...Kg7
          
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:09AM
I don't know I told the opponent it would been better to take my took and stop the checkmate and only get checked and have a way out
     
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by FragileKitty  on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:19AM
Congrats!
Alekhine Solution
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Feb 2016 at 1:06PM
For over ten years I have been searching for a solution to this infamous position. Known as the Veronezh Variation, it arises from the 5...cxd6 variation of the Exchange Variation of Alekhine's Defense. Much more common is 5...exd6, but it is so sedate. Smiling

Nedev-Oney
Heraklio 1997

1 e4 Nf6 2 e5 Nd5 3 c4 Nb6 4 d4 d6 5 exd6 cxd6?! 6 Nc3 g6 7 Be3 Bg7 8 Rc1 0-0 9 b3


White has evacuated the fianchettoed Black king's bishop's diagonal and supported the c pawn with the b pawn. In effect, giving Black nothing to bite on. If 9...Nc6?! White can play 10 d5! and Na5 attacking the c pawn looks silly. Black has tried 9...e5, 9...f5 and 9...Bf5.

9...e5?! 10 dxe5 dxe5 11 Qxd8 Rxd8 12 c5! and Black is clearly inferior.
9...f5?! 10 g3!? (10 Nh3!?) e5 11 dxe5 dxd5 12 Qxd8 Rxd8 13 c5! again, Black is clearly inferior.

9...Bf5!? is my main focus. 10 Nf3 d5!?

Btw, Nigel Davies does not have a solution and suggests Black avoid the variation altogether. I refuse! Smiling

Any suggestions would be welcome.
Chess HTH
Posted by Birds of Prey on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:51AM
Any well versed Chess player like to play a game? I just noticed it being here and want to give it a try to see how things are with it. Let me know.
FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Feb 2016 at 10:34AM
https://ratings.fide.com/top.phtml?list=men

There are, unbelievably, 46 players rated at or above 2700. World champion Magnus Carlsen (2844) and Vladimir Kramnik (2801) are over 2800. The United States has three players in the Top 10: Fabiano Caruana (2787), Hikaru Nakamura (2787) and Wesley So (2773).

1Magnus CarlsenNorway2844
2Vladimir KramnikRussia2801
3Anish GiriNetherlands2798
4Levon AronianArmenia2792
5Fabian CaruanaUSA2787
6Hikaru NakamuraUSA2787
7Maxime Vachier-LagraveFrance2785
8Viswanathan AnandIndia2784
9Veselin TopalovBulgaria2780
10Wesley SoUSA2773
     
Re: FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by rabbitoid  on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:34AM
Since the value is relative you have a bootstrap effect which becomes noticeable after a time (a long time).
          
Re: FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:38AM
And that's Fabiano Caruana in the list, not Fabian, the 50s teen idol. Smiling
Doubling cube in chess?
Posted by Guanarteme  on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:22AM
I am asking this question about chess, but I could just as easily have asked it about other games. Many years ago, my friend, the late Rick Callaghan (International Correspondence Master, as well as checker player) and I discussed the possibility of a doubling cube in chess. We were trying to avoid interminable games where a player on principle dragged on a lost position. In a multi-game match, a player could double, confronting his opponent with the prospect of losing two points instead of one. That could reduce the number of long drawn out games.

We concluded that we did not like the prospect of a stronger player simply intimidating his opponent into resigning by doubling the stakes in a complex, but even, position.

We also discussed the possibility of allowing players to agree to a result other than 1-0, 0-1 and - . For example, a player who had a better position where a win was likely, but not certain, could offer his opponent of a point.

We never tried out these options. though we often played many games in one night and could have done something like that. Has anybody done this or heard of somebody doing it? I am not sure Id want to, but am curious as to whether it would have worked out as we envisioned it.
     
Re: Doubling cube in chess?
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:44AM
I've never heard of this and I'm against anything that isn't traditional chess but you have a point when it comes to interminable games in lost positions. In some games there comes a point when there is no chance for one player to win, especially if they are much lower rated and it has become clear they are simply dragging the game out till it's final inevitable mate. This is against policy here at GT, but not enforced.

I suspect with these players they will simply accept the double and then do the same thing again.
Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 19 Feb 2016 at 10:50AM
Due to my eyes not being what they once were and the increasingly minuscule print of chess books I have been forced to purchase my chess books in eBook format. More difficult to use, as I expected, but I can still add notes to variations I find useful.

Two recent books I bought and a page from the Scotch book...

     
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by JohnDerek on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:27AM
Where in your opinion is the best site to buy them from ?
          
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:39AM
Amazon. Most are priced at $9.99 which is considerably lower than paperback versions at $24.09.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=play+the+slav

Barnes and Noble is much higher priced.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/play-the-slav-james-vigus/1101130466?ean=9781857448948
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 10:53AM
These are US prices, of course. I'm not sure how it is in the UK.

You can also add notes quite easily. Here is an example:

          
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by cubs on 22 Feb 2016 at 12:49AM
Smaller city, huge, good store. Wonderful personal service and the best price. No, I don't work there. Tell them Dave sent you...
Rochesster Chess Center
221 Norris Drive
Rochester, NY 14610
1-800-ON-CHESS
(1-800-662-4377)
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by JohnDerek on 22 Feb 2016 at 9:19AM
A bit too far for me to travel !
                    
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 22 Feb 2016 at 9:37AM
First travel to Plovdiv. You can go anywhere after that. Smiling
                    
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by cubs on 24 Feb 2016 at 1:20AM
Perhaps you have a telephone... or a computer to look at a web page. If not, they sell both in Phillipopolis.
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 24 Feb 2016 at 9:55AM
love that place, use to really love the holiday catalogues.
I'm rooting for...
Posted by unbeatable on 18 Feb 2016 at 3:33PM
Mr.Nakamura in the upcoming candidates gathering
Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by Robyn Hode on 16 Feb 2016 at 2:20PM
Excuse my Brooklynese...

A line in the Philidor: 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Bc4. The most common response is 3...Be7 to stop 4 Ng5 with a double attack on f7 (similar to the Two Knights Defense with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6 4 Ng5) except that Black has moved his d pawn instead of his queen's knight.

But what if Black wants to entice White into playing Ng5? How about 3...Nf6 and then 4...Ng5?

Christian Bauer in The Philidor Files gives only the continuation 4...d5 (as in the Two Knights variation) 5 exd5 h6 6 Nf3 e4 7 Qe2 Be7!? 8 Ne5 claiming that White "holds onto his loot" (the captured Black d pawn) in a favorable position.



Does Black have to play Bauer's line? Or can he play 7...Bb4!



In this line Black is ready to 0-0 and then place the rook on e8. A white knight on e5 would no longer be advantageous. Notice also that after 7...Bb4! 8 c3?! Black can 8...0-0 since now 9 cxb4 exf3.

So what can White play in response to 7...Bb4!. Perhaps 8 0-0 0-0 9 Nd4 Re8 or 9...Bc5. In any case this latter position is superior for Black to Bauer's line. White is not as aggressively placed and that advanced Black e pawn causes queenside development problems for White. His setup appears almost artificial.

I agree, I have too much time on my hands. Smiling
     
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by cubs on 16 Feb 2016 at 8:37PM
Or, simply, 3...Be6.
          
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by Robyn Hode on 16 Feb 2016 at 8:56PM
That's possible. Not a very popular response on databases and after 4 Bxe6 fxe6 5 d4 exd4 6 Nxd4 Black's kingside is a little airy and he's down a tempo. I like the other lines better. Just my opinion though.

Bauer says White has the easier game and can play for a f4-f5 lever. But Black appears moderately safe. In the other line Black seems to have the advantage.
               
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 16 Feb 2016 at 10:29PM
Am maybe a rookie but I would castle the king
               
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by cubs on 18 Feb 2016 at 12:03AM
5. d4, Nc6. Try it, You might like it. 6. dxe, dxe. No white minor pieces will arrive any time soon on the d or f files. Two open files. Life is good...
Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 4:51AM
At moment I have 3 the chess apps Chess free which I can choose a difficult setting from practice - 12
Chess tactic pro which gives me 6
Puzzles hard, medium, easy
Chess which shoes me what moves to make.

But I was wondering if there is any other chess app to download
?
     
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 5:25AM
Why do you need 3 more, surely 1 is enough, provided that you can choose the difficulty, and use them Don't play the hard tactic yet, though. And. please, don't use them for a serious game at all!
          
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 6:08AM
Practice makes perfect more I practice I do the better my game
               
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 8:05AM
Agreed! But does two or more apps look more like you couldn't care less about them rather than the other way around? Just a thought, if you like having them all, go for it!
                    
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 8:09AM
I was just wondering both help me out
                         
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 12:00PM
Both yes, three or more no - does that help you?
                              
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 12:02PM
My three apps help me
Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 4 Feb 2016 at 11:01PM
#10098956

What those think constructive criticism only please Smiling
     
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Feb 2016 at 4:10PM
Can you explain the reasoning (why) you played 3...Ba6? You've opened the a8-h1 diagonal and then instead of playing ...Bb7 (or ...e6), you performed a feat of alchemy by changing your bishop on a6 into a doubled pawn. If White had played 4 e5 then ...Nd5 5 c4! Nb6 (5...bxc4 is losing) 6 c5 Nd5 7 Nc3 Bb7 (7...Nxc3 8 bxc3 e6 9 d4) 8 Nxb5 and you have lost a pawn and tempos.

In the game, you have sacrificed your knight on your fifth move for virtually no compensation (weakened dark squares? but the Bg5 remains). You are essentially lost at this point.

If you're just starting out it's best to play something like 1...c5 or 1...e6 against 1 e4. In the opening you are contesting control of the central squares either directly or indirectly. I would not recommend 1...e5 because there are too many ancient traps to fall into.

His blunder is on move 20 a3? (overloading the queen) was compounded with 21 Qxc2?? which leads to mate. If he had played simply 20. Nc3 freeing the rook on a1 to defend the bishop then you would have been down two pieces without compensation.

On the good side, you did see 20...Nxc2!, but 21 Nd2 holds. You win the rook but are still down materially. At that point all four of your remaining pieces are hanging and uncoordinated. Your knight on a1 is out of play, your bishop on a6 blocked by a pawn, the rook is prey to active minor pieces and the queen is busy having tea with her king.

Play the Sicilian of the French defense.
          
Re: Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 5 Feb 2016 at 9:53PM
The knight was sacrificed on 5th move to stop the castle and to move the king out on the board but granted I do need more practice
               
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Feb 2016 at 10:30PM
OK, but you have to weigh the value of the piece. In this case it was not worth sacrificing for a minor positional consideration. You are giving up a piece and all your other pieces are still at home and a long way from taking advantage of White not castling. After 4 Bg5 you could have played h6, in effect asking, "Are you going to take the knight and give me the bishop pair and a half open e file?" Or you could have played c5 to contest the d4 square. If he then plays e5 then you play Nd5 and then possibly Nc7. Knights on c7 and c6 are excellent--you are transposing into a sort of Sicilian setup. You will have to move the bishop back to b7 so you lost a tempo. But your position is playable. Your strategy will be to undermine his center.
Remember, chess has been studied for hundreds of years so there is very little that is new in the opening. Sacrificing a knight on move 5 is dubious. Even the line in the Petroff where white sacs on f7 is not very good. 
                    
Re: Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 6 Feb 2016 at 1:07AM
Thank you.Smiling
                         
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Feb 2016 at 11:21AM
You're welcome David. Smiling

I would recommend 1...e6 against anything. When I was first starting playing in tournaments my mentor suggested I play the Modern Defense (1...g6) and it wasn't right for me. I kept getting steered into Pirc setups or simply bum rushed off the board with pawn rollers. I didn't know how or when to strike back. I decided I needed something more closely related to my current level of understanding. Also, I needed a universal type of opening. Something that was similar in themes no matter what I was facing. So I choose 1...e6.

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5
1 e4 e6 2 f4 d5
1 d4 e6 2 c4 d5
1 c4 e6 2 e4 d5
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5
1 d4 e6 2 Nf3 d5
1 Nf3 e6 2 d4 d5
1 Nf3 e6 2 c4 d5
1 g3 e6 2 Bg2 d5
1 g3 e6 2 c4 d5

Same idea. Support a pawn on d5 with a pawn on e6. Stake a claim in the center of the board. Most of the time you will be playing a French Defense (against 1 e4) or a Queen's Gambit (against 1 d4).

Against the French Defense (1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5) you will see a lot of Exchange (3 exd5 exd5) and Advance Variations (3 e5 c5). To a lesser extent Tarrasch ( 3 Nd2 c5 or Be7 or Nf6) or 3 Nc3 when you can play a Winawer with 3...Bb4 or, as I played back then, a Rubinstein setup with 3...dxe4 4 Nxe4 Nd7. All these lines are solid and not particularly difficult to understand. At first you should select as few variations as possible and become familiar with them.

Against the Queen's Gambit ( 1 d4 e6 2 c4 d5) you'll see many different setups, but it's safe and sound to play 3...Nf6 4...Be7 5...0-0. You can play it against the QG, Catalan, Reti, etc.

Of course you're going to see odd setups. But the system works against anything and because you will be playing it over and over again you will become familiar with the positions. Eventually, you may know more about it than your opponents since you are always seeing these positions!
Passive Slav
Posted by Robyn Hode on 27 Jan 2016 at 2:09PM
Recent game on FICS where Black choose to play a very passive Slav, not knowing how to break. This position was reached with White to move. Notice how Black's pieces have abandoned the defense of his King.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.g3 Be7 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Bg2 c6 7.O-O Nbd7 8.b3 Re8?! (better is b6 and Bb7 and Rc8)
9.Bb2 Qc7 10.Rc1 Qb8 11.Re1 a6 12.e4 dxe4 13.Nxe4 Nxe4 14.Rxe4 Nf6 15.Re2
Rd8 16.Qc2 Qd6 17.Ne5 Nd7 18.d5 (opening the position) cxd5 19.cxd5 exd5

White to play and win



20.Nxf7 White will sac two pieces and the exchange to force mate on the exposed and defenseless king as three Black pieces watch helplessly as their queen tries to fend off the attack. Only the prelate offers his head, but it is too late.

Kxf7 21.Qxh7 Nf6 22.Bxd5+ Qxd5 23.Rxe7+ Kxe7 24.Qxg7+ Qf7 25.Bxf6+ Ke8 26.Qh8+ Qf8 27.Qh5+
Qf7 28.Re1+ Be6 29.Rxe6+ Kf8 30.Qh6+ Kg8 31.Qh8# 1-0

Final Position

Cancellations in pre-Internet days
Posted by Guanarteme  on 24 Jan 2016 at 8:35AM
The storm and the cancellations it brought on has reminded me of the situation in the 1960s and 1970s when there was no Internet. If there was inclement weather or some other situation (e.g. campus political disturbances) there was no way to cancel a chess tournament, as one did not know who was coming or how to contact players intending to come. I organized several opens in those days and remember once being told that it should be cancelled. I explained that most players did not preregister and that I had no idea who or how many were planning to come, or how to reach them. This was compounded by the fact that in those days prize money was not necessarily contingent on attendance, so a strong player who showed up had traveled with a reasonable expectation of winning some money.

The concept of an open tournament was as problematic for my father (who was not a chess player) as the concept of a wedding without RSVP. What if everybody in the country showed up? And it became even more problematic when there was a reason to cancel the event. Today the Internet allows us to post cancellations, and to receive alerts. And organizers are more prone to make prizes contingent on attendance. But it was not always so.
     
Re: Sorry, guys, no 72 virgins for chess players...
Posted by Rogue Trooper on 22 Jan 2016 at 8:13AM
No chess, no music, no dogs, no way!
Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Bobbyb1947  on 5 Jan 2016 at 11:04AM
I for one got what I expected!(from the trailer) Toby should have watched Bobby Fisher Against the World and Anything to Win!! The movie lacked completely the joking comedian side of Fischer! Toby portrayed Fischer as a person of HATE only! This was not accurate at all!! And did I miss something in my study of Bobby's life?? Where did the priest fit in? Bobby had nothing at all to do with that Religion!! As for the rest of the cast? For me at least they left NOTHING TO BE DESIRED!! (only my own opinion)
     
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 5 Jan 2016 at 11:52AM
GM William Lombardy a Catholic priest was a long time friend and second to Bobby Fischer in real life.
          
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Birds of Prey on 5 Jan 2016 at 12:55PM
Yes, it could've been made better! Maybe the next one will be better!
               
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 5 Jan 2016 at 1:22PM
they took liberties with the facts

like when Fischer ran from the press at the airport he actually ended up at IM Anthony Saidy's home where his father was dying of cancer.
          
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by cubs on 5 Jan 2016 at 9:44PM
Lombardy is no longer a priest, and is/was a prominent, successful IGM,
               
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 10 Jan 2016 at 11:42PM
I am a little out of touch, but he was back then.
     
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by JerNYC on 3 Feb 2016 at 5:29PM
I thought Schreiber did a better job as Spassky than Maguire did as Fischer. But Sarsgaard as the priest confidante was best of all. I wonder if Lombardy's life story would have made for a more interesting movie with his relationship with Fischer as a sub-plot.
          
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 4 Feb 2016 at 9:05PM
I agree
A noble sacrifice
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 5 Jan 2016 at 4:19AM
i was playing a chess today in RL and in a sacrifice move i sacrificed my knight to safely get my bishop out and also to safely capture my opponents knight Smiling
Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by dama1  on 3 Jan 2016 at 8:21AM
     
Re: Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by Robyn Hode on 3 Jan 2016 at 8:26AM
Nak can win that 4 move odds game but it will be tough to draw the pawn odds games.
          
Re: Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by JerNYC on 3 Jan 2016 at 12:18PM
What's an odds game?
               
Re: Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by Robyn Hode on 3 Jan 2016 at 12:21PM
A material or move advantage. Komodo will begin the game without its f pawn. In another game Nakamura will have four moves made for him to none for Komodo before the game begins.
                    
Re: Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by JerNYC on 3 Jan 2016 at 12:29PM
They should try Extinction Chess. Grinning
                    
Re: Nakamura To Play Komodo In Odds Match
Posted by Bobbyb1947  on 5 Jan 2016 at 10:48AM
Wouldn't the four moves in advance be a "death sentence?"
Viva Le France!
Posted by Bobbyb1947  on 21 Nov 2015 at 5:08PM
In my government group we are at anytime 250-300 strong! It has been the ULTIMATE PRIVILEGE to work with some Frenchmen and Frenchwomen both here and to "chat" abroad!! Best of luck to "Le group!"
Vive la France !!
Posted by Grimsweeper  on 14 Nov 2015 at 7:53AM
     
Re: Vive la France !!
Posted by rabbitoid  on 14 Nov 2015 at 8:09AM
Merci! Support from friends is always welcome.
          
Re: Vive la France !!
Posted by cubs on 14 Nov 2015 at 2:12PM
France is America's old, dear friend and every free man's second home.
               
Re: Vive la France !!
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Nov 2015 at 9:20AM
Our oldest ally of whom if not for Lafayette and de Grasse many more years of bloodshed might have occurred.


1 e4 e6 pour la France.
Expensive Paperback
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Nov 2015 at 1:23PM
     
Re: Expensive Paperback
Posted by cubs on 5 Nov 2015 at 1:43PM
Many chess books are like the girls in New York City: slim and expensive.
          
Re: Expensive Paperback
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Nov 2015 at 1:44PM
LOL

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