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What's the Move?
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Jul 2016 at 10:42AM
From a very famous tournament between two of the greatest players of all time.

White has just played Rch3.

What is Black's best move?

     
Re: What's the Move?
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 24 Jul 2016 at 11:20AM
If black plays it wrong and moves king to the corner check mate with two rooks. Best move is black bishop 1 space up
          
Re: What's the Move?
Posted by JohnDerek on 24 Jul 2016 at 11:50AM
1...dxc4 might be a move to look at ? If 1...Bg5 or g7 then 2.Rxh7 is winning.
               
Re: What's the Move?
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Jul 2016 at 11:51AM
Yes John, that was the move played, 19...dxc4. Very good. Not easy to find.

The game was played between Paul Keres (W) and Vasily Smyslov (B) at the famous Zurich International Chess Tournament in 1953. It took place in the 24th round and Keres was trailing Smyslov by a half point. Keres decided to play for the win.

Here is what David Bronstein wrote in his book about the move [my diagrams]:

Of course the text move resulted in a deep study of the position. First of all, Black is opening his bishop's diagonal, creating the possibility of transferring that piece via e4 to f5 or g6. Secondly, the d-file is opened, creating the possibility of moving the queen to d5 and attacking the square g2 along the diagonal, or simply taking the d-pawn with the queen. And thirdly, a passed c-pawn temporarily makes its appearance; it may go on to c3, closing the diagonal of the dangerous white bishop... Meanwhile, the white rook is still en prise, and now the basic threat of..g6:h5 is a real one; for on 20 bc, for example, 20...gh 21 Q:h5 Be4.



Still, we are all curious to see what might have happened if Black had taken the rook right away--wouldn't 19 gh 20 Q:h5 Re8 have saved him, by opening an escape hatch for the king? No, since White would have cut off his escape with the startling 21 a4!!, threatening 22 Ba3.



Fascinating to read how the top players assess a position's possibilities.
getting better
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 22 Jul 2016 at 2:29AM
forgot to add a subject

#10346203
(no subject)
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 22 Jul 2016 at 2:29AM
#10346203 one of my better games Smiling
Go to the Source
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Jul 2016 at 4:08PM
When in doubt about something, like say, an opening...go to the source!

     
Re: Go to the Source
Posted by Birds of Prey on 21 Jul 2016 at 4:12PM
That is so cool!!!!!!
          
Re: Go to the Source
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Jul 2016 at 4:44PM
Those with a sharp eye will notice the bishop on f8 is missing. I forgot to put it back. Smiling
               
Re: Go to the Source
Posted by rabbitoid  on 21 Jul 2016 at 8:35PM
Why, that's how my 7 year old grandson wins. He must have borrowed your book!
                    
Re: Go to the Source
Posted by Robyn Hode on 23 Jul 2016 at 2:03PM
For those of you wondering what "Go to the Source" might mean; the position on the board (if you place a bishop on f8) is the Taimanov System of the Sicilian Defense. So, how to play against it? Well, Go to the Source, and the book on the right, which is about the Taimanov System was written (see bottom of book) by Mark Taimanov. Yes, the same Taimanov who lost to Fischer in the 1971 Candidates Quarterfinal 6-0. But Taimanov was a very good player. That result in 1971 was not an indication of his true strength.
This is an old book though. Lots of improvements since this book was written. A good person to study if you want to learn to play this system is Judit Polgar.


Here's Taimanov defeating World Champion Anatoly Karpov in 1977 (not the Taimanov System).

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067980

[Event "October Revolution 60th Anniversary"]
[Site "Leningrad URS"]
[Date "1977.06.25"]
[EventDate "1977.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Anatoly Karpov"]
[Black "Mark Taimanov"]
[ECO "B32"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "76"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. c4 e5 6. Nb3 Nf6
7. Nc3 Bb4 8. f3 O-O 9. Be3 d6 10. Rc1 b6 11. Bd3 Bc5 12. Qd2
Be6 13. Nxc5 bxc5 14. O-O Nd4 15. Nd5 Nd7 16. f4 Rb8 17. f5
Bxd5 18. cxd5 Qb6 19. Rf2 f6 20. Rc4 a5 21. Ra4 Ra8 22. Qe1
Ra7 23. b3 Rfa8 24. Rb2 Qc7 25. Bd2 Nb6 26. Rxa5 c4 27. Bf1
Rxa5 28. Bxa5 Qc5 29. Bxb6 Qxb6 30. Kh1 cxb3 31. axb3 g6
32. fxg6 hxg6 33. b4 Kg7 34. b5 f5 35. exf5 Nxf5 36. Rb3 Qd4
37. b6 Ra1 38. Rb1 Ng3+ {analysis: 39. hxg3 Ra8} 0-1

Or 39 Qxg3 Rxb1
     
Re: Go to the Source
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 21 Jul 2016 at 11:06PM
I accept your challenge
A Happy Champion
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Jul 2016 at 12:03AM
"My head is filled with sunshine!"

Tal the day after defeating Botvinnik for the World Championship.

--My Great Predecessors Vol II, Garry Kasparov
Some improvement
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 11 Jul 2016 at 6:41AM
Think I am improving but I should of moved a pawn up to make a escape route in this game

#10354785
     
Re: Some improvement
Posted by unbeatable on 11 Jul 2016 at 9:22AM
Every game should be a learning experience
          
Re: Some improvement
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 11 Jul 2016 at 9:25AM
I should of moved f5 to f7 checking the king and also given me a way of escape
               
Re: Some improvement
Posted by Birds of Prey on 11 Jul 2016 at 10:20AM
Where's Robby when we need him, lol!!!!!!
               
Re: Some improvement
Posted by FragileKitty  on 11 Jul 2016 at 10:20AM
Don't give check just to give check. ...f7-f5 weakens the e6-pawn and leaves a hole on e5 (i.e., you can no longer play ...f7-f6 to drive the white king or a piece from there). Your main focus should be to stop White's d-pawn from promoting. You have a 4-3 kingside pawn majority, so if you can win White's d-pawn, you can then work toward advancing them and eventually promoting your own pawn.
                    
Re: Some improvement
Posted by Robyn Hode on 11 Jul 2016 at 11:32AM
You also need to work on your opening David so you don't get in these kinds of positions. Your second move, 2...Bd6 is incorrect. You've blocked your d pawn from advancing. On your 5th move you lose a piece.There is no square for your bishop if White plays 6 e5.

Take a look at your position after your 14th move. Discounting the fact you are down a piece, White has 4 pieces developed and has castled. You have only your queen developed. In effect, you are playing 1 piece against 5. You are down 4 tempos.

After 1 e4 e6 2 Nf3 you have two good moves: 2 ...d5 (French Defense) and 2 ...c5 (Sicilian Defense). In your games you tend to rely too much on piece play and neglect your pawns. You need to understand pawn structure. Create a solid, yet flexible pawn formation that allows you to control the center and prepare pawn breaks. Don't move your pieces more than once in the opening and don't bring your queen out too early.
                         
Re: Some improvement
Posted by Birds of Prey on 11 Jul 2016 at 12:09PM
There we be, lol!!!!!!
                              
Re: Some improvement
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 11 Jul 2016 at 12:11PM
Thanks for all the good advice I keep practicing
                         
Re: Some improvement
Posted by Robyn Hode on 11 Jul 2016 at 12:15PM
Look at these two positions. On the left you have immediately staked a claim in the center by pushing your d pawn. You attack White's e pawn. You control both the c4 and e4 squares. You are forcing White to make a decision. Does he push the pawn to e5, where you can then play 3...c5 and control the b4 square and contest d4. If he does then he's moved the e pawn twice already. Or does he play exd5 and release the tension in the center? You simply play exd5, then Bd6, Nf6 and 0-0. Easy. He can play 3. Nc3 but after 3...Nf6 (my choice) 4 e5 Nd7 you are fine since your next move will be c5, again pressuring the center. (I won't comment on the French Wing Gambit here).

On the right, again you are contesting the d4 square and controlling the b4 square. White can play d4 but then you play cxd4 and after Nxd4 you have a variety of moves. Nf6, Nc6, or a6. Note that after 1 e4 e6 2 Nf3 c5 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 White cannot play 5 e5? as you can play 5...Qa5+ and 6...Qxe5.

2...d5 French Defense2...c5 Sicilian Defense
King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jul 2016 at 12:52PM
Edmar Mednis has some excellent videos on endgames.

Here's a famous study. White to play and win. Hint: Think Opposition.

     
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 6 Jul 2016 at 2:45PM
White pawn to move one space up blocking black pawn
          
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jul 2016 at 3:23PM
Correct, why is that necessary instead of Ke4 bringing the White king closer to the pawn?
               
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 6 Jul 2016 at 5:00PM
At a guess even though I am still learning

To stop the black king from moving down it does and it be in a check position
                    
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jul 2016 at 5:26PM
First off, congratulations on finding the correct move David. Smiling Many players would simply move their king closer to the pawns. But if they did play Ke4 then Black plays b5! and the game is a draw. White's win has evaporated. The problem for White is that even though he can win the Black pawn he can never gain the opposition. The Black king will always be able to block any further advance.

Here is a possible continuation:

1. Ke4? b5! 2. Kc4 Kb6 3. Kd6 Kb7 4. Kc5 Kc7! Black has gained the opposition 5. Kxb5 Kb7 6. Ka4 Ka6 7. Ka3 Kb7 8. b5 Kc7 9. Kb4 Kb7 10. Ka5 Ka7 11. b6+ Kb7 12 Kb5 Kb8 and now Black can continue to move the King back and forth on b7 and b8. Or if White plays Kc6 then Kc8 or Ka6 then Ka8. Black can always gain the opposition. There is no way for the White king to get to a7 or c7 to push the Black king away from the queening square on b8.

Drawn Position



                         
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jul 2016 at 5:55PM
Now if White plays b5! first he can gain the opposition and the Black king cannot stop the pawn. White will win.

Here's a possible continuation:

1. b5! Kb8 2. Ke4 Kc7 3. Ke5 Kd7 4. Kd5 Kc7 5. Ke6 Kc8 6. Kd6 Kb7 7. Kd7 (notice how White has the opposition instead of Black) Kb8 8. Kc6 Ka7 9. Kc7 Ka8 10. Kxb6 Kb8 11. Ka6 Kc7 12. b6+ Kc8 13. Ka7...

White Wins

                              
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by JerNYC on 6 Jul 2016 at 8:55PM
Before I even scrolled down for the answer, I also chose moving the white pawn up a space to choke off two escape routes for the black king and basically cornering him as you advance the white king to that quadrant. Thank you for the demonstration. Thumbs up
                                   
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 6 Jul 2016 at 11:33PM
It just shows am improving my chess game Smiling
                                        
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by Robyn Hode on 7 Jul 2016 at 9:50AM
Yes you are. Now when you are playing a game that looks like a draw you will know it's a win.
                                             
Re: King and Pawn Endgame
Posted by rabbitoid  on 7 Jul 2016 at 10:09AM
Now I get it. When I look at a game against you I know is a draw you somehow always win Smiling
Books to Improve Your Game
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jul 2016 at 12:46PM
I would also recommend Pawn Power in Chess by Hans Kmoch. Note: Reshevsky's book is in Algebraic Notation and has many errors. I would recommend you get the older 70s edition with Descriptive Notation.

Clinton Chess
Posted by unbeatable on 5 Jul 2016 at 10:39AM
Replace the King with Hil(l)ary Clinton and the queen with Bill Clinton. Your goal is to trap either one before hell freezes over. Your chance of success is 0/infinity Enjoy
     
Re: Clinton Chess
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 5 Jul 2016 at 10:49AM
The Bishops Knights that attack could be terrorists that attack the Clinton reign
     
Re: Clinton Chess
Posted by Grimsweeper on 6 Jul 2016 at 7:52AM
you should make political statements on a political board and leave this space open for discussion of chess
Chess Story
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Jun 2016 at 1:22PM
Chessplayers here might be interested in a story written for the Writing with Style DB.

The Hilliad

Playing chess gambit
On last night's episode of Braindead...
Posted by unbeatable on 21 Jun 2016 at 12:40PM
a chess player's head exploded...sweet dreams everybody Grinning
Nakamura beats Carlsen !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted by unbeatable on 18 Jun 2016 at 12:00AM
at rapid time control !!!!!!!!!!! and is 1.5/5 and in last place !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
Re: Nakamura beats Carlsen !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted by FragileKitty  on 18 Jun 2016 at 7:30AM
While Carlsen has been the highest rated player in classical chess for awhile, Nakamura had led the rapid chess ratings. They have an amusing history of trash talk:

Nakamura’s tweet during the final stages of the Anand-Carlsen match:

"Starting to realize that I am the only person who is going to be able to stop Sauron in the context of chess history."

Carlsen's response on Reddit:

"I've never actually watched Lord of the Rings... if I had, and Nakamura had been a better chess player, I might have been more insulted."

Nakamura's response tweet:

"Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but I am #1 in blitz, rapid and 960, and if that is being bad at chess, so be it!"

Carlsen on Kramnik:

"I'm a little disappointed that Kramnik is way down in sixth place in the world rankings. It's just too bad. Now he's coming down to Nakamura territory."

And finally, Carlsen on the subject of his trash talk about Nakamura:

"It's fun to talk. And so far I’ve been following up the talk with games. So then it's fine."
          
Re: Nakamura beats Carlsen !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posted by Grimsweeper on 21 Jun 2016 at 6:03AM
chess players lol
Reti-Rubenstein Carlsbad 1923
Posted by Robyn Hode on 15 Jun 2016 at 12:03PM
Studying the position after Reti's 27 Qb2

R.I.P...
Posted by unbeatable on 13 Jun 2016 at 3:22AM
IM Danny Kopec
     
Re: R.I.P...
Posted by FragileKitty  on 13 Jun 2016 at 6:43AM
I fondly remember going through one of his books (Test, Evaluate and Improve Your Chess) many years ago.
     
Re: R.I.P...
Posted by Grimsweeper on 13 Jun 2016 at 2:30PM
he was only 62 years old
          
Re: R.I.P...
Posted by Oakheart on 14 Jun 2016 at 3:46PM
too young
               
Re: R.I.P...
Posted by Robyn Hode on 14 Jun 2016 at 3:48PM
Fischer was, ironically, only 64 (squares).
                    
Re: R.I.P...
Posted by rabbitoid  on 14 Jun 2016 at 9:21PM
too old.
Viktor Korchnoi 1931-2016
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Jun 2016 at 12:50PM
The great grandmaster passed away today in Switzerland. He was 85.

My first book of chess was Viktor Korchnoi's Best Games and I still have it. What a great player he was. Twice defeated by Karpov for the World Chess Championship he was never afraid to grab a pawn and hold it. A tenacious fighter over the board and colorful person away from it. He will be missed.

     
Re: Viktor Korchnoi 1931-2016
Posted by Dionysos  on 6 Jun 2016 at 1:46PM
When I was playing chess, BEFORE they even had computers, Viktor was playing anyone who plays in Luton, near London, England. Won 49, drew 1 - and no, I wasn't the one who drew!

But when the games were over, he greeted anyone who played, and, considering the people took the scores down he obviously didn't, he could remember the names of the players, and where they gone wrong. Such a brilliant mind! He was, I guess, about 40 years old, then.
     
Re: Viktor Korchnoi 1931-2016
Posted by unbeatable on 7 Jun 2016 at 2:34PM
FIDE is not mentioning Viktor on its website. However they do mention the passing of Indonesia's first GM.
          
Re: Viktor Korchnoi 1931-2016
Posted by Dionysos  on 8 Jun 2016 at 5:26AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viktor_Korchnoi though, is.

Viktor Lvovich Korchnoi (Russian: Ви́ктор Льво́вич Корчно́й; IPA: [vʲiktər lʲvovʲɪtɕ kɐrtɕˈnoj]; 23 March 1931 – 6 June 2016) was a professional chess grandmaster and author. He is considered one of the strongest players never to have become World Chess Champion.

Born in Leningrad, Soviet Union, Korchnoi defected to the Netherlands in 1976 and later resided in Switzerland for many years. Korchnoi played three matches against Anatoly Karpov. In 1974, he lost the Candidates final to Karpov, who was declared world champion in 1975 when Bobby Fischer refused to defend his title. He then won two consecutive Candidates cycles to qualify for World Championship matches with Karpov in 1978 and 1981, losing both.

Korchnoi was a candidate for the World Championship on ten occasions (1962, 1968, 1971, 1974, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1985, 1988 and 1991). He was also a four-time USSR chess champion, a five-time member of Soviet teams that won the European championship, and a six-time member of Soviet teams that won the Chess Olympiad. In September 2006, he won the World Senior Chess Championship.
          
Re: Viktor Korchnoi 1931-2016
Posted by JohnDerek on 8 Jun 2016 at 5:50AM
chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Jun 2016 at 9:37AM
I found this game from long ago. It is the only recorded game between two of the best players ever at GT. I don't remember who the comments are by, bilbo, chrismiles or me as the file is from over a decade ago.

[Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "chrismiles"] [Black "bilbo"]

1. Nf3 d6 { Provocative. Black chooses not to prohibit 2 e4 with either 1...d5 or 1...Nf6.} 2. d4 Nf6 {Nowadays chrismiles might choose 3 Nc3 and directing the game along Pirc/Modern Defense paths.} 3. c4 g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 O-O 6. h3 {White prepares for Bg5 as Black cannot now play Ng4 and also protects Nf3, lessening possible pressure on d4.} Na6 {Modern, Black will play for c5 and can redeploy to Nc7-e6 to harrass Bg5 if necessary.} 7. Bg5 c5 8. d5 Nc7 9. Bd3 {Or Qd2} e5 10. Qd2 {And the center is locked, play will proceed along the wings.} Qe8 { Releasing the pin on f6 and preparing qside expansion.} 11. g4 Bd7 12. Nh2 { White moves the knight again allowing Black time to begin his own counterplay.} b5 {13 f4?! b4!} 13. cxb5 Nxb5 14. Bxb5 Bxb5 15. h4 {White's attack proceeds, but his king is remains in the center. Black must address this chance quickly.} Rb8 16. h5 Qe7 17. f3 { Supporting both g4 and e4 and freeing the Nh2. White will redeploy.} Ba6 { Clearing the b file while prohibiting 0-0.} 18. Nf1 Rb4 { Black's plan unfolds logically and brilliantly.} 19. Nd1 Rfb8 { After Black is now on the attack. White must defend accurately.} 20. Rc1 Qb7 { Trippling with the heavy artillery on the b-file} 21. Be3 Ne8 22. Qf2 Bd3 23. Rc3 Bxf1 24. Kxf1 {24 Qxf1 seems better.} Qa6+ 25. Kg2 {White wants to get the Monarch to safety, this may be the reason for Kxf1. He can now defend and attack without direct threats to his Highness.} Qxa2 26. Ra3 Qc4 27. hxg6 fxg6 28. Rxa7 { Did White see this variation from 23 Rc1? If so, we must be impressed!} R4b7 29. Rxb7 Rxb7 30. g5 Bf8 31. Nc3 Nc7 32. Ra1 Na6 33. Bc1 {White's ability to defend the beleagured b pawn with minor pieces has been very important.} Nb4 { There's a hole on d3...} 34. Ra4 {Pinning...} Qb3 35. Ra3 Qc2 36. Qd2 { Black has been pressuring that b pawn by threatening a fork on d3 and White has responding by harrasing the queen. If the b pawn goes, Black's protected passed c pawn may prove decisive in the endgame.} Qxd2+ 37. Bxd2 Nc2 38. Ra2 Rb3 39. Nb1 Nb4 40. Bxb4 Rxb4 41. Kg3 h5 42. gxh6 1/2-1/2
     
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by FragileKitty  on 5 Jun 2016 at 11:35AM
Thanks for posting this! Two incredible players.
     
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by JerNYC on 5 Jun 2016 at 12:27PM
What makes you think the games you're playing against Simpan56 aren't the best ever played at GT? Maybe you only remember the other two as the best because back then you weren't up to their level but could either one beat you today?
          
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by Grimsweeper on 5 Jun 2016 at 2:00PM
maybe it is because the one game he is playing against Simpan56 is only on it's 7th move and it is all book so far.
               
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by JerNYC on 5 Jun 2016 at 2:44PM
This is their third game. The last two ended in draws. I was just trying to make a point that nobody ever holds a permanent title of being the best ever. (Except, Muhammad Ali.) They are usually the best of their time. I think Robyn is the best chess player on GT right now. I know he doesn't want me to say that, nor does he ever fully believe it, but the record speaks for itself. Stats don't lie. Tournaments don't lie. Ladders don't lie. The proof is in the results. Who's to say that one day someone might not hold up his games versus Simpan56, or George1955, or Khayman as the gold standard?
                    
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Jun 2016 at 4:43PM
That's very kind of you but the two best players are Grimsweeper and khayman, neither of whom I've beaten (timeouts don't count). chrismiles is an English master.
                    
Re: chrismiles vs bilbo
Posted by Grimsweeper on 5 Jun 2016 at 7:13PM
I won 87 chess tournaments here at goldtoken was #1 on the rating list longer than anyone else, I had the highest tournament rating ever gained here at GT and was top of the ladder for a very long time until the powers that be collapsed it so everyone could start over. I decided to retire from tournament play here and limit my play to a more serious chess site.

Chess is a game of history, I could show you a game played in the year 1475 of course I will not because you would not appreciate it

Robyn and I are old friends, he is a very resourceful player did you know he use to change his screen name every week? Chrismiles and Bilbo were very good players before them didi was unstoppable

I am sure that my friend will play many beautiful games here in the future, but none of them will make Chrismiles and Bilbo any less brilliant.
I float like a pawn island...
Posted by unbeatable on 4 Jun 2016 at 1:34AM
and sting like an ignored knight.
On last night's Odd Couple episode...
Posted by unbeatable on 17 May 2016 at 5:00AM
BLACK MOVED FIRST Laughing
     
Re: On last night's Odd Couple episode...
Posted by Dionysos  on 17 May 2016 at 5:57AM
Also, in quite a few "moves" on films, the board is wrong - the white pieces should be on the white square, but I think the producers and directors don't play chess at all, and the actors don't either!
          
Re: On last night's Odd Couple episode...
Posted by unbeatable on 17 May 2016 at 6:28AM
Do you mean wrong color square in right-hand corner?
               
Re: On last night's Odd Couple episode...
Posted by Dionysos  on 17 May 2016 at 7:22AM
Exactly that!
     
Re: On last night's Odd Couple episode...
Posted by cubs on 17 May 2016 at 12:05PM
Oddly enough, this is not, in the history of chess, illegal. Color assignment two hundred years ago (I was only in junior high then) had to do with who won the last game...
Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by unbeatable on 13 May 2016 at 2:45AM
Chess is a sea in which an elephant may bathe and a gnat may drink if it doesn't see the elephant.
     
Re: Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by Robyn Hode on 13 May 2016 at 12:20PM
I recently played a game where I was the gnat and didn't see the elephant.
     
Re: Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by unbeatable on 15 May 2016 at 3:57AM
Every 23rd spring for 23 games it gets to cheat
          
Re: Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by Grimsweeper on 16 May 2016 at 6:40AM
he who cheats next to last loses.
               
Re: Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by FragileKitty  on 16 May 2016 at 7:12AM
My kingdom for a tent pole.
                    
Re: Altered Chess Quotes
Posted by Grimsweeper on 17 May 2016 at 12:40PM
broforth and conquer!!
Fighting Pawns nerds you
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 8 May 2016 at 8:34AM
The Fighting Pawns Club

If you were in this club or want to join please feel free to join
     
Re: Fighting Pawns nerds you
Posted by Robyn Hode on 8 May 2016 at 11:13AM
I like that subject heading. Smiling
          
Re: Fighting Pawns nerds you
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 8 May 2016 at 11:22AM
I know I meant needs you not needs you
               
Re: Fighting Pawns nerds you
Posted by Robyn Hode on 8 May 2016 at 11:24AM
But that is a good anyway. Double meaning. I would use that myself if I were not already in a club.
          
Re: Fighting Pawns nerds you
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 8 May 2016 at 11:24AM
I know I meant needs you not nerds you
Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by unbeatable on 7 May 2016 at 2:57PM
In the long haul it is best to capture as few pieces as possible besides the kings.
     
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Ray of Light  on 7 May 2016 at 3:19PM
I would recommend capturing pieces until there is only one left of each type. However, I will always capture a queen when I have the chance.
the strategy here is to reduce the chance of each type being selected before an opponent move. If the opponent has 5 piece types on the board, then each type has a 20% chance of being selected. If you have a queen bearing down on your kings, that is much better than your opponent only having a king and a queen. The chance of each piece, in that case, is 50%.
In the endgame, I try to leave as many minor pieces available as possible. Again, I will favour my queen and try to protect her. I want an endgame where the piece types have an increased chance to play.
          
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Ray of Light  on 7 May 2016 at 3:20PM
What I mean to state, in the last paragraph of my previous post is that I leave as many of my minor pieces dangling as I can. I don't mind if my opponent munches on them. This just increases the probability of each remaining piece.
               
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Grimsweeper on 8 May 2016 at 5:50PM
sounds like turning on more lights to keep a room dark as possible.
               
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 9:20AM
Chess/Dice is all Random.
the dice control every move.
Even if you play the odds; close off pieces; the dice run in patterns.
the patterns are random.
Random means anything that happens is random.
The dice can move you over 20 times in a row.
The King by itself can win a game.
you can surround the king and have the dice pattern move the king to take every piece and win the game.
It all depends on the dice random pattern you are in and when you see it change.
I have placed near 2000 games. counting chess/dice and Bow 10x10.
whenever I move e3/e4 the king moves forward 99% of the time.
and it has still not changed from that pattern; no matter what part of the game e3/e4/ is attempted.
The rules say every piece has an equal chance; I found that is not so; it is random.
Random is anything that happens; example my e3/e4/ is "Random" for all those games and for no other reason.
when the opponents move (either color) e3/e4 their Q or B move forward 99% of the times; and has always been and that is because it is ; "Random".
you can win moving the knight; in 4 moves.
or; the knight will make your next move a rook with no space to escape; if you don't roll a pawn.
The dice are and can think.
Most people play a couple games and think their rating is strong.
play 30/40/50 games at a time; and maintaining a steady rating with as many 'Different people' as possible.
A lot of people play the same people over and over to get a rating.
that's fine if you also play many other people who have different '
Dice" patterns.
When you play a lot of games your ratings will go up and down depending on the ratings of the people you play; because of the site bully rule.
in the beginning I would have a few points/ play new people win/ and lose points because they had no points.
the computer seems to check if they play chess; if so; you have a better chance with points when you win.
Now people have ratings/ and it is more fair.
I have been following patterns since I started this game and the dice run in patterns and change at random times.
so when the rules say each type piece has a random chance; no matter how many pieces there are;
the dice do not know this information; and may not agree for short or long time periods.

      The Jun 2016 — Knight Jarlynn's Dice Chess rematch Tournament    

Knight Jarlynn
                    
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 9:27AM
I don't think you fully understand the meaning of the word random... you say repeatedly in your post that it is random, and then you talk about patterns. Random means no patterns... just saying...
                         
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 9:32AM
Random means anything that happens/nothing is fixed.
anything that happens is random.
the dice can do anything/ not fixed because it is random.
If you toss a coin/ any result is random.
any roll of the die is random.
Knight Jarlynn
                              
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 9:37AM
Exactly, so any patterns you may think you're seeing in a randomly selected number, don't actually exist.
                                   
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 10:25AM
It is called random patterns.
1700 games with the same results still continuing is a "Pattern".
If you research it you will find; if a person flips a coin the same 500 times in a row or any other combination/ the reason is because it is 'Random".
I am talking about real games on the board/ not search engines.
The dice are making patterns; they change patterns at random times.
If you learn to see the patterns you can use them.
I have saved many a game knowing e3/e4 would move the King out of the way of a Knight or another piece because of the same pattern of the dice.
The dice do run in random patterns for no reason.
Somebody buys a lottery ticket and wins with one ticket as a quick pick; because the win was random.
The dice forming patterns is because it is random.
It has been showing this since I have been playing.
The dice run in patterns; called 'random'/ random patterns.
what about backgammon and counting/ don't the dice have patterns.
I don't play but heard that.
but I know for a fact; the dice do move in patterns with Chess Dice.
Call it random patterns but they are there
Knight Jarlynn
                                        
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 10:56AM
I just pulled up 20 Dice Chess games to look for this pattern (I know that's not a large sample, but if the pattern truly existed it should be somewhat present in any size sample), of those 20 games 11 never moved e3/e4, of the 9 that did, only 2 were immediately followed by a King move, the other 7 were not, so I'm not seeing this 90% that you're talking about. If anything, I'm sure you're just a victim of "confirmation bias" where you remember the times that support your "pattern" and dismiss the times that don't. Honestly, if I were to see that you were right, I would say that Goldtoken needed to recode their random number generator, truly random numbers should not produce dependable patterns.
                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Ray of Light  on 9 May 2016 at 11:04AM
For the record, all randomness in every GoldToken game is supplied by the rand() function contained in the Perl programming language. It is considered a pseudo-random function, but sufficient for our purposes.
                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by FragileKitty  on 9 May 2016 at 11:12AM
While I agree with everything you've said, I just wanted the throw this in (you probably already know it):

There is no true randomness with computer algorithms. The best they can do is simulate true randomness, and they do a pretty good job at this.

Older (and possibly some existing) randomizing algorithms require programmers to supply a seed value upon initialization (e.g., the current date and time), and vary that value on each use. If the code didn't vary the seed value, then a predictable pattern would emerge (if you know when the initialization occurs), and this is a common bug found in code that could be exploited.
                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 12:03PM
Yes, I am aware that there is no true randomness in computer algorithms, but if done correctly it can closely approximate it, which is why I made the comment that if a discernible pattern was emerging, Goldtoken should recode their random number generator. Thank you for the clarification, however, in case someone else was not aware.
                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by RamaWolf  on 10 May 2016 at 6:46AM
Humboldt University Berlin, Germany offers the QRNG service:

  QRNG Service - Hu-berlin.de
  https://qrng.physik.hu-berlin.de/‎;
We provide a new quantum random number generator (QRNG) based on the quantum randomness of photon arrival times. It promises provable and long term ...
  QRNG Service - Download
  https://qrng.physik.hu-berlin.de/download‎;
You can also use the library libQRNG in your own programs to retrieve random data from the QRNG service. The library is available for Windows and Linux

and it's not difficult to icorporate this TRUE random numbers into an algorithm
                                                       
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by FragileKitty  on 10 May 2016 at 7:33AM
Very cool! Thanks for letting us know.
                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 11:34AM
go to the beginning and look through..you are nitpicking.
 there are over 1700 games.
and most are as I said.
Your games do not represent all the games I played with different people to reach over 1700 games.
e3/e4 happened with many different people and not one person.
so what you are saying makes no sense.
It is based on over 1700 games since i have been playing.
I also did not say 100%; I said 99%.
Every now and then i would get a Q or B; but it is the exception to the rule.
and the dice do run in patterns and they change patterns.
I kept tabs and have seen the same patterns repeated and new pattern combinations.
the times I got A non king move; indicates a pattern change.
Each person has different patterns with their game with the dice.
20 games out of 1730 something is just silly to look for patterns; when it happened with 1700 plus games; and is continuing right now.
It just saved a piece in a game.
The King was open and took the attacking piece.
I am also losing a handful of games because of this pattern I have been in for over 2 months; waiting for the change.
When the pattern changes I will catch up again until the next change.
When the pattern works for the opponent;
closing pieces,
playing the odds,
using less pieces,
everything that is supposed to work does not.
when you have a good pattern; it works quite well.
because you know what will happen when you move a piece with the pattern you see, and know from before.
And as I said ; if you play 30-50 games at one time, you see all kinds of things happen; such as the dice making patterns.
Random Patterns.
It has been that way from the very beginning.
Knight Jarlynn
                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 11:37AM
my post is to Rand and not to kitty.

<><>...
                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 12:00PM
I was going to go through your personal history for my test, but as you have me chumped I can't see your profile, and I'm not going to go through everyone else on the site looking for games specifically against you. I'm willing to bet, though, that if you go through your own personal history and tabulate all the times that the e3/e4 move is made, and what percentage of those moves are immediately followed by a king move, you will see that it is nowhere near the 90% you originally said, let alone the 99% you are now saying.
                                                       
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 12:07PM
And I can tell you; you are completely incorrect.
In other words; you are Wrong!

and your games mean nothing at 20 games; to 1730 games.
it makes no sense.
you are just nitpicking again.
Have you played 1730 games; I didn't think so.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                            
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 12:08PM
Okay, if I'm wrong, tell me exact numbers, in how many of those 1730 games was the e3/e4 moves made, and how many of those were immediately followed by a king move?
                                                                 
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 12:22PM
Excuse me.
You don't tell me what to do.
I know what they are.
I don't need to look.
been there/done that.
had to find an alternate way to play; since I can't play the center because of it.
been following the patterns all along.
you are 'NITPICKING" to find something wrong/
and I don't really care.
and your 20 games makes no sense.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                      
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 12:32PM
You just proved my point. "I don't need to look" because your mind has already compiled the times your pattern has been supported, and dismissed all the times it hasn't.

Confirmation bias at work.
                                                                           
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 1:25PM
AS I Said you are TOTALLY, AS ALWAYS "WRONG"!
and that is a Fact!

Knight Jarlynn

       
                                                                                
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 1:29PM
The only fact here is that you are forming an opinion, and assigning a probability to a phenomenon that you have not actually tested. If you had kept accurate records of your games where this happened to the point where you could support your claim of it happening 99% of the time, you would share those numbers. That you are not willing to provide these specific numbers shows that you are just making up a number and saying your history supports it.
                                                                                     
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 1:38PM
 AGAIN!!!

YOU are Wrong!
As Always you are.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                          
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 1:41PM
Facts trump opinions, sorry. If you can't back up your claim, then you are the one that is wrong.
                                                                                               
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 1:52PM
This is the Chess DB.
You didn't even know that.
YOU ARE WRONG Again!


Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                    
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 1:57PM
How could you possibly think I didn't know this was the Chess DB? It still doesn't change the fact that you assigned a probability to a phenomenon (that happens in a chess game) without any data to support your statement.
                                                                                                         
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 9 May 2016 at 2:18PM
AGAIN you are WRONG!   

        INCORRECT>       this is Chess Dice/ not chess.  

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                              
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 9 May 2016 at 2:28PM
Dice Chess is a form of Chess, which is why we're speaking about it on the Chess DB, I don't even understand what you're trying to get at right now. Bottom line is you were giving inaccurate probabilities in a thread where people were talking about adjusting probabilities, and I called you out on it. Get over it, you were wrong and making a false statement, and I corrected it.
                                                                                                                   
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Robyn Hode on 9 May 2016 at 3:25PM
If anyone is interested, I've just written a new random function in Turbo Pascal 6.0 for DOS that not only creates random patterns but also randomly chumps people who are more than 100% wrong.

I will post it on my GeoCities website. You may access it there or simply use AOL Keyword: RandomPatternChumper.
                                                                                                                        
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by JerNYC on 10 May 2016 at 12:55PM
Will it also play Thermonuclear War and randomly figure out all the launch codes? Typing
                                                                                                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Robyn Hode on 10 May 2016 at 1:23PM
Yes, but only on a dial up modem with Ally Sheedy near by. Smiling
                                                                                                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by JerNYC on 10 May 2016 at 2:07PM
You should name this program, "Joshua." He should also be able to play a nice game of chess. This is the chess board after all. Staying on topic and such.
                                                                                                                   
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 17 May 2016 at 3:48PM
To Randathor:
You don't tell me to get over it.
YOU GET OVER IT!    
and you are completely wrong.
Your reasons are just plain silly.
you have no experience in chess/dice.
you have not played well over 1700 plus games' with 50 games at a time on a daily basis.
then you would notice patterns.
When a knight wins in 4 moves and does it a gain; it is a pattern.
I have won 10 games in a row; a pattern.
the dice run in patterns; in my games, in my random patterns.
the dice change patterns for no reasons and move in different random patterns and favor different pieces.
Chess sees patterns of the same moves in the first year of playing.
Salvo random pick the decoys has patterns over time; left side/right side/middle/top/bottom/spread out.
and there is software for that/reason I stopped 150 games at the same times.
There are Random patterns in Chess/dice and they change at random times for no reason without warning because they are random.
Random Patterns.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                                        
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 18 May 2016 at 9:51AM
First off, I don't know why you're rehashing a week old conversation without bringing anything new to it. Second off, I don't care if you've played 1700 games, I don't even care if you've played 17,000 games, if you can't provide statistical data to support your claims, I'm not going to believe that you can affect what your next move will be with 99% certainty just by making a specific move. It's just not feasible.
                                                                                                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 18 May 2016 at 9:58AM
This reminds me of a episode of weakest link when a contestant was asked why get rid of the strongest link and won a few money he said because I have the game at home
                                                                                                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 18 May 2016 at 5:00PM
hey David;
            from Zen Flesh Zen Bones
101 Zen Stories

A Cup of Tea

Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912) received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen. Nan-in saved tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring. The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. ‘It is overfull. No more will go in!’ ‘Like this cup,’ Nan-in said. ‘You are full of your own opinions and speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup? ‘

ps. anybody who studies 'Martial Arts', studies 'GO NO SEN'.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                                             
Moderated   
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 18 May 2016 at 4:45PM
                                                                                                                             
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 18 May 2016 at 8:31PM
AND you would be WRONG again!
The dice change random patterns.
One piece can move 20 plus times in a row.
You don not have a clue.
Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                                                  
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Dionysos  on 19 May 2016 at 12:10AM
Always, whether it's politics or chess, you are right and everyone else is wrong. But it cannot be!
                                                                                                                                       
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 19 May 2016 at 11:53AM
AS Always politics board ; now Chess DB; you are
Attacking;
   AGAIN               

It is not the archer.
It is not the bow.
It is not the arrow.
It is not the flight of the arrow.
It is not the target.
It is nothing.

Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                                                            
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Dionysos  on 19 May 2016 at 12:00PM
I'm not "attacking" at all, all I said, in politics AND chess, is that you are ALWAYS right, and the others are ALWAYS wrong.
If you are wrong, just accept it, and not go over and over and over it ad nausium.
                                                                                                                                                 
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 19 May 2016 at 12:04PM
I agree with dionysos here you not always right about everything I maybe a chess novice but that does not mean I automatically become better at chess
                                                                                                                                                      
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 19 May 2016 at 6:19PM
chess/dice is not chess.
what has that got to do with chess/dice.
What does that have to do with chess/dice random patterns for one piece which can move over and over many times.
And what I said in the beginning is still true.
"Anybody can win a game of Chess/dice"
people can play and win, even if they do not play 'Chess".
The dice control the pieces even if you make the best move; even if you set up and play the odds.
The dice run in random patterns and can change just like that for no reason; or remain for short or long time periods.
Also the best players area needs an update on move numbers in Chess/dice when I looked.
Knight Jarlynn
                                                                                                                                                 
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Knight Jarlynn on 19 May 2016 at 6:08PM
Attack number two. You are attacking with insults!
 AGAIN!
Why don't you add nausium to yourself.
Everytime you attack I will Counter attack.
You called me/ I didn't call you.
What goes, returns.

Knight Jarlynn
             
                                                                                                                                                      
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Dionysos  on 20 May 2016 at 4:30AM
I'm not "attacking" at all, all I said, in politics AND chess, is that you are ALWAYS right, and the others are ALWAYS wrong.
If you are wrong, just accept it, and not go over and over and over it ad nausium.

That isn't an attack, just that you are ALWAYS right, even if you are wrong.

Ad nausium is aimed at you, not me. But I don't think you even know what that means!

Are you EVER wrong? I doubt it, at least I doubt if YOU ever say that you say that.
                                                                                                                                                           
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 20 May 2016 at 4:37AM
A little life experience if you were in a job and argued like that you be fired in 5 minutes
                                                                                                                                                                
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Dionysos  on 20 May 2016 at 6:32AM
"ME" or "knight*? I THINK you mean knight, he is ALWAYS attacking, whether it's a good point or a bad one. It's neither necessary nor desirable.
                                                                                                                                                                     
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 20 May 2016 at 6:48AM
Knight I mean if Knight started arguing like that in a work environment she be fired in 5 minutes
                                                                                                                                                                          
Re: Dice Chess Strategy
Posted by Dionysos  on 20 May 2016 at 7:47AM
I THOUGHT that it was a "he", not a "she" - but either way, I agree.

I used to be a Marketing Director for an American computer accessories company, in Europe, before I was retired, I wouldn't talk like that to my employers, or expect them to talk like that to me either.
Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Apr 2016 at 10:42PM
Kasparov can still play the Scotch, here's his blitz win over Nakamura.

[Event "Ultimate Blitz Challenge"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2016.04.28"]
[EventDate "2016.04.28"]
[Round "5.2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Garry Kasparov"]
[Black "Hikaru Nakamura"]
[ECO "C45"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "97"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Be3 Qf6 6. c3
Nge7 7. Bc4 Ne5 8. Bb3 d6 9. O-O O-O 10. f3 N7c6 11. Kh1 Bb6
12. Na3 Kh8 13. Qd2 Na5 14. Ndb5 Bxe3 15. Qxe3 Qe7 16. Bc2 a6
17. Nd4 c5 18. Ne2 Nac4 19. Nxc4 Nxc4 20. Qc1 f5 21. b3 Nb6
22. c4 fxe4 23. Bxe4 Bf5 24. Ng3 Bxe4 25. Nxe4 Rad8 26. Re1
Rfe8 27. Qd2 Qf8 28. Ng5 Qf6 29. Rxe8+ Rxe8 30. Re1 Rxe1+
31. Qxe1 Nd7 32. Qe8+ Nf8 33. h3 Kg8 34. Ne4 Qf4 35. Qe7 Qc1+
36. Kh2 Qf4+ 37. Kg1 Qc1+ 38. Kf2 Qb2+ 39. Kg3 h5 40. Nxd6 h4+
41. Qxh4 Ng6 42. Qe4 Qf6 43. Nf5 Qg5+ 44. Kh2 Nf4 45. g3 Nh5
46. f4 Qd8 47. Qd5+ Qxd5 48. Ne7+ Kf7 49. Nxd5 1-0

This is one of my favorite variations for White. Kasparov chooses 7 Bc4 instead of the newer 7 Qf3. I play the latter line all the time in blitz online.

Kasparov has defeated Caruana, Nakamura and So and lost to So twice, once to Nakamura and drawn Caruana.

The table with one more day to play:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87292&crosstable=1
     
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by unbeatable on 29 Apr 2016 at 4:29AM
Apparently Garry tried moving a piece twice or some other shenanigans and Nakamura let it slide.
          
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Grimsweeper on 29 Apr 2016 at 10:35AM
not for the first time
               
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 29 Apr 2016 at 10:36AM
Said Judit.
                    
Re: Ultimate Blitz Challenge Tournament
Posted by Robyn Hode on 29 Apr 2016 at 4:09PM
Final results:

Hikaru Nakamura: 11/18 (8 wins, 4 losses, 6 draws)
Wesley So: 10/18 (7 wins, 5 losses, 6 draws)
Garry Kasparov: 9.5/18 (6 wins 5 losses, 7 draws)
Fabiano Caruana: 5.5/18 (3 wins, 10 losses, 5 draws)

An impressive performance for the 53 year old Kasparov who has been retired since 2005. He more than held his own against 3 of the top 10 players in the world. Only So gave him problems. Kasparov had one win, 2 draws and 3 losses to So. It's somewhat ironic because Kasparov had said So wasn't quite "ready" for the top competition when he lost to Nakamura's KID several months ago. Kasparov probably would have fared better if he hadn't played King's Indians, Grunfelds and Moderns as Black. He could have been like the World Championship Challenger, Sergey Karjakin who used to play the KID all the time and lost points because of it--and in the Candidates played the safer Queen's Indian. But Kasparov played for blood.

Here's his last game where he squashed Caruana's Reti with aggressive play.

[Event "Ultimate Blitz Challenge"]
[Site "Saint Louis USA"]
[Date "2016.04.29"]
[EventDate "2016.04.28"]
[Round "18.1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Fabiano Caruana"]
[Black "Garry Kasparov"]
[ECO "A05"]
[WhiteElo "2795"]
[BlackElo "2812"]
[PlyCount "74"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. c4 d6 6. b3 e5
7. Bb2 c5 8. e3 Nc6 9. Nc3 Bf5 10. d4 e4 11. Ne1 Re8 12. Nc2
h5 13. Qd2 h4 14. Ba3 b6 15. Rfd1 Bg4 16. Rdc1 Qd7 17. b4 Qf5
18. Bb2 Rad8 19. Nb5 Bf3 20. d5 Ne5 21. Bxe5 Rxe5 22. Ne1 hxg3
23. fxg3 Bh6 24. Rab1 Kg7 25. Rb3 Qh5 26. h3 Nh7 27. g4 Bxg4
28. hxg4 Qxg4 29. Qd1 Qg3 30. Qe2 Ng5 31. Kh1 Rh8 32. Nxd6 Kg8
33. bxc5 Bf8+ 34. Kg1 Nh3+ 35. Kf1 Bxd6 36. cxd6 Rf5+ 37. Nf3
Rxf3+ 0-1
Chessgi Tournament #2
US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 14 Apr 2016 at 5:09AM
start today
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by JerNYC on 14 Apr 2016 at 10:47AM
Anyone from GT competing?
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 16 Apr 2016 at 4:49AM
So,Caruana,& Robson are leading at 2/2...So vs.Caruana today
     
Re: US Chess Championships...
Posted by unbeatable on 26 Apr 2016 at 2:57PM
Caruana emerged as champion. Now Kasparov and the top 3 will play a 5min 3 sec delay blitz event. 18 games each player for 50K
Alice Chess
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 11 Apr 2016 at 3:55PM
I was not aware of this variant until I just saw a game posted on the bug board. The variant looks interesting, but I have a couple of questions/clarifications that I feel the rules page does not adequately cover, and hoped people here could. I think, it looks like capturing has to be done on the same board that the piece starts on, but immediately after capturing the piece that did the capture then moves to the other board? Or can you move to a space that's empty on your current board and then capture after the transition?

Moving out of check: If your king is in check on the board that it is starting the move on, to move out of check does the space need to be out of check on both boards, or just the board you will end up on after the move and transition?
     
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Ray of Light  on 11 Apr 2016 at 7:28PM
This is indeed a fun variant. If you wish, send me an invite.

In Alice Chess, all captures may only be executed on the same board as the capturing piece.
Each time that a piece moves it is transported to the other board. This includes captures.
You cannot move to a square that is occupied on the other board. Think of the two boards in the following manner: Take one board and place it on top of the other board so that they are superimposed. No pieces will ever overlap each other.
When the king is in check on one board, it has the option of moving such that it transports itself to the other board, but it cannot fall into check on the other board.
Also, if the king is in check, it cannot move onto an illegal square with impunity knowing that it will be whisked away to possible freedom on the other board. All moves must be legal on the one board before the transport occurs.

Hope that this helps.
          
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Rand al*Thor  on 12 Apr 2016 at 12:21PM
Thanks, so for a king to move, the space being moved to must be out of check on both boards. That's what I had assumed, just wasn't sure.
               
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by Ray of Light  on 12 Apr 2016 at 12:55PM
Yes, every move must be legal on the board on which the move is being made. The transport happens at the end of all legal moves.
                    
Re: Alice Chess
Posted by rabbitoid  on 12 Apr 2016 at 2:50PM
I always thought the rule was a bit incoherent. Why should a king's move to a square be illegal if he is then no longer there to be taken? Never mind. This is a variant so it can has it's own set of rules, as long as they are well defined and make for an interesting, even chanced and tough variant. Alice chess certainly qualifies, on all counts.
Robert James Fischer...
Posted by unbeatable on 8 Apr 2016 at 9:01AM
is apparently mentioned in the Panama Papers
Karjakin ...
Posted by unbeatable on 8 Apr 2016 at 8:52AM
has withdrawn from this month's event in Norway. Sounds like he is 100% focused on the world championship match in November. The Norway organizers are not pleased.
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:03AM
Especially as he died in 2008!
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:04AM
...Especially as he died in 2008!
          
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Grimsweeper on 9 Apr 2016 at 4:45AM
In July 2008 Karjakin convincingly won a rapid chess match against GM Nigel Short 7½–2½.

In February 2009 he won his first elite tournament in the A group of the Corus chess tournament in Wijk aan Zee (category XIX) with a score of 8/13.

July 2012 Karjakin won the World Rapid Chess Championship a full point ahead of world number one Magnus Carlsen in Astana, Kazakhstan.

In March 2014, he finished in second place in the FIDE Candidates Tournament held in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, behind Viswanathan Anand.
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 5:06AM
Sorry about that -I was thinking not of Karjakin but of the previous one, with Robert James Fischer!
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Apr 2016 at 5:08AM
Sorry about that, I was thinking not about Karjakin, but about the previous reply, to Robert James Fischer.
                    
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Robyn Hode on 9 Apr 2016 at 9:08AM
Robert James Karjakin, the greatest of champeens.
               
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by JerNYC on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:29PM
Does it strike anyone else odd that chess championships are being played in remote places like Astana, Kazakhstan and Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia? What happened, they couldn't get Mongolia? Granted, if this were the 1800s, those might seem like exciting destinations, but you would think the game's governing body could arrange these tournaments in more tourist-friendly cities that could attract more media coverage.
                    
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by Robyn Hode on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:37PM
I think it may have to do with FIDE president Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. Would have been interesting if Kasparov had won the election. More championships in New York, London, etc.
                         
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by JerNYC on 10 Apr 2016 at 2:54PM
Imagine if instead of NYC, Paris, London, and Melbourne, the grand slam of tennis tournaments was held in Pyongyang, Kabul, Mogadishu, and Guam. We would be hearing a lot less about tennis.
     
Re: Karjakin ...
Posted by unbeatable on 13 Apr 2016 at 8:51AM
Apparently Sergey will play Magnus at the upcoming Bilboa/Bilbao event
No fool can play chess...
Posted by unbeatable on 1 Apr 2016 at 5:35AM
but only fools do - german proverb
Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 9:34AM
By defeating Fabiano Caruana with the White pieces.

B67 Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7
1.e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 h6 10. Bh4 b5 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. f5 Qb6 13. fxe6 fxe6 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. Bd3 h5 16. Kb1 b4 17. Ne2 Qc5 18. Rhf1 Bh6 19. Qe1 a5 20. b3 Rg8 21. g3 Ke7 22. Bc4 Be3 23. Rf3 Rg4 24. Qf1 Rf8 25. Nf4 Bxf4 26. Rxf4 a4 27. bxa4 Bxa4 28. Qd3 Bc6 29. Bb3 Rg5 30. e5 Rxe5 31. Rc4 Rd5 32. Qe2 Qb6 33. Rh4 Re5 34. Qd3 Bg2 35. Rd4 d5 36. Qd2 Re4 37. Rxd5 exd5 38. Qxd5 Qc7 39. Qf5 Rf7 40. Bxf7 Qe5 41. Rd7+ Kf8 42. Rd8+ 1-0

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

He will now play World Champion Magnus Carlsen for the title. Youth will be served. The old guard has finally fallen!
     
Re: Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 10:40AM
Conversation on the game has centered on Caruana's 37...Rd5?. Apparently he had a slightly superior position but that move loses. Best may have been 37...Bf3 with an equal position.
          
Re: Sergey Karjakin Wins Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 28 Mar 2016 at 10:42AM
Check that. 36 ...Re4 when 36 ...Bf3 is equal.
Karjakin vs Caruana
Posted by Robyn Hode on 27 Mar 2016 at 4:42PM
It all comes down to one game tomorrow. Sergey Karjakin, with the White pieces, vs Fabiano Caruana. Both are at 7.5/13. Karjarkin has three wins and Caruana 2. Both have defeated third place Anand 7/13.

Tiebreak criteria:

1. head-to-head results between the tied players
2. number of wins
3. Sonneborn-Berger score
4. rapid/blitz playoffs
Sergey Karjarkin Back on Top at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 5:59PM
After defeating the hapless Veselin Topalov (4 losses) with the Keres Attack vs the Najdorf Sicilian. An unusual game by Karjarkin. Very original.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

[Event "World Championship Candidates"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2016.03.25"]
[EventDate "2016.03.10"]
[Round "12"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Sergey Karjakin"]
[Black "Veselin Topalov"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "2760"]
[BlackElo "2780"]
[PlyCount "69"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. h3 e6
7. g4 Nfd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. g5 b5 10. a3 Bb7 11. h4 O-O 12. Qd2
Nb6 13. h5 N8d7 14. g6 Ne5 15. O-O-O Nbc4 16. Bxc4 Nxc4
17. Qe2 Rc8 18. h6 fxg6 19. Nxe6 Qd7 20. Nxf8 Bxf8 21. hxg7
Bxg7 22. Bd4 a5 23. Bxg7 Qxg7 24. Qg4 Re8 25. Qg5 Bc6 26. Qh6
Qh8 27. b3 Nxa3 28. Rh3 Bd7 29. Rg3 Qf6 30. Rh1 Re7 31. Qh4
Qg7 32. Nd5 Rf7 33. Qd8+ Qf8 34. Qxa5 Nxc2 35. Qc3 1-0
Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Mar 2016 at 2:00PM
The swashbuckling Vishy Anand, 46, after defeating Aronian in a Giuoco Piano, then losing to Caruana in an English Four Knights, ground down co-leader Kajarkin's Berlin Defense in a rook and BOC endgame. He now leads at 6.5/11 with 4 wins. Caruana also is at 6.5/11 with 2 wins but loses on tiebreaks.

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?page=2&tid=87151

Anish Giri, following in the footsteps of Peter Leko, has 11 draws in 11 games.
     
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by JohnDerek on 24 Mar 2016 at 11:40PM
Anand would lose on tiebreak to Caruana as he lost game to him.
          
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Mar 2016 at 11:59PM
then losing to Caruana in an English Four Knights

You're right, John. Thanks for the correction. Smiling
               
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by JohnDerek on 25 Mar 2016 at 12:23AM
What happens if there's a 3 way tie ?. A play off ?
                    
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 10:45AM
I'm not sure on that.
     
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by unbeatable on 25 Mar 2016 at 9:29AM
Anand lost today
          
Re: Anand Surges Into Lead at Candidates
Posted by Robyn Hode on 25 Mar 2016 at 10:45AM
That's two English Four Knights he's lost in this tourney.
Down Goes Frazier
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Mar 2016 at 10:17PM
Or Nakamura, who suffered his third loss in the Candidates. At the same time, the Ageless Anand won for the third time and is now tied for first with Karjakin at 5.5/9 after defeating Aronian in a ....Giuoco Piano (!).

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?page=2&tid=87151
Best chance for chess success (imo)...
Posted by unbeatable on 20 Mar 2016 at 10:54AM
is to fully learn and only play one opening
Hou Yifan/Yifan Hou...
Posted by unbeatable on 14 Mar 2016 at 3:18PM
is now 4x world champion !!!!
Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 11 Mar 2016 at 9:02AM
Topalov, Giri, Anand, Nakamura, Caruana, Karjakin, Svidler, and Aronian.

Anand beat Topalov. Caruana and Nakamura drew.


Anand (W)-Topalov (B)

1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. c3 O-O 7. Nbd2 Ne7 8. d4 exd4 9. cxd4 Bb6 10. Re1 Bg4 11. h3 Bh5 12. a4 a6 13. Bf1 Re8 14. a5 Ba7 15. Qb3 Nc6 16. d5 Nd4 17. Nxd4 Bxd4 18. Qxb7 Nd7 19. Nc4 Nc5 20. Qc6 Nb3 21. Rb1 Nxc1 22. Rbxc1 Rb8 23. Qxa6 Qh4 24. Rc2 Rxe4 25. Ne3 Qd8 26. Qc4 Bg6 27. Bd3 Rf4 28. Bxg6 hxg6 29. g3 Re4 30. a6 Qe8 31. Rce2 Bb6 32. Qd3 Ra8 33. Kg2 Qa4 34. b3 Rd4 35. bxa4 Rxd3 36. Nc4 Rxa6 37. a5 Bd4 38. Re8+ Kh7 39. R1e7 Rc3 40. Nd2 Rc2 41. Ne4 f6 42. h4 Rxa5 43. Rf7 g5 44. h5 Rxf2+ 45. Nxf2 Ra2 46. Rff8 Rxf2+ 47. Kh3 g4+ 48. Kxg4 f5+ 49. Rxf5 1-0

Nakamura (W))-Caruana (B)

1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.e3 e6 5.d4 cxd4 6.exd4 Ne7 7.d5
exd5 8.cxd5 d6 9.Nc3 Nd7 10.Nf3 O-O 11.O-O h6 12.h4 Nc5 13.Re1
Bg4 14.Bf4 Nf5 15.Qd2 Bxf3 16.Bxf3 Qf6 17.Rac1 a5 18.Nb5 Qxb2
19.Qxb2 Bxb2 20.Rc2 Bf6 21.Bxd6 Nxd6 22.Nxd6 b6 23.Rb1 Rab8
24.Nc4 Na4 25.Bg4 Rfd8 26.d6 h5 27.Bh3 b5 28.Nxa5 Rxd6 29.Nc6
Rb6 30.Nb4 Nc3 31.Rb3 1/2-1/2
     
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by unbeatable on 12 Mar 2016 at 7:19PM
Nakamura lost today Sad
          
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 12 Mar 2016 at 8:17PM
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=87151&crosstable=1

Nak sacs a piece but it doesn't work out. Time trouble also.

[Event "World Championship Candidates"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2016.03.12"]
[EventDate "2016.03.10"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Sergey Karjakin"]
[Black "Hikaru Nakamura"]
[ECO "E15"]
[WhiteElo "2760"]
[BlackElo "2790"]
[PlyCount "75"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7
7. Bg2 d5 8. cxd5 exd5 9. O-O O-O 10. Nc3 Nbd7 11. Qc2 Re8
12. Rfd1 Nf8 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Bc1 Ne6 15. Bb2 Bd6 16. e3 a6
17. Ne2 c5 18. dxc5 Nxc5 19. Nd3 Nce4 20. Rac1 Rc8 21. Qb1 Qe7
22. Bd4 Rxc1 23. Rxc1 b5 24. b4 Nd7 25. a3 Nf8 26. Ba1 Ne6
27. Qa2 Bc7 28. Nd4 Bb6 29. h4 Nxg3 30. fxg3 Nxd4 31. Bxd4
Bxd4 32. exd4 Qe3+ 33. Qf2 Qxd3 34. Rc7 f5 35. Rxb7 h6
36. Bxd5+ Kh7 37. Bg2 Re2 38. Bf1 1-0
     
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by unbeatable on 18 Mar 2016 at 9:03AM
Nakamura will lose 5 to 10 percent of his prize money
          
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by JerNYC on 18 Mar 2016 at 10:47AM
IF GT had earnings leaders, Robyn would need two banks to hold all his winnings. Blinking
               
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:11AM
I'd put my money on Grimsweeper and khayman. Against Grim I've never even had a superior position in any of our games. He's like granite. Against khayman only once have I had a better position. Needless to say I've never beaten either (timeouts don't count) and I've lost several.

If I were to list the best players ever at GT, I'd go with Grim, khayman, chrismiles and bilbo. Several active players, Catalinn, Simpan56 and George1955 are right up there. And we can't forget some early players (back when chessplayers were royalty on GT), like didi.
                    
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by rabbitoid  on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:36AM
I've had the honour of losing to each one of them. And you too Smiling
                         
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 18 Mar 2016 at 11:42AM
But you are the best all-around player at GT by far!
                    
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper on 21 Mar 2016 at 1:41AM
Congrats on becoming the top dog
you didn't include didi, he was on top for a long time
                         
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Mar 2016 at 9:05AM
Thanks Grim. I'm only on top now because you are only playing a few games and khayman timed out on many. I'll be going back down after several draws upcoming.
                              
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper on 23 Mar 2016 at 6:19PM
I am playing over at gameknot where I have trouble breaking the top 150 Smiling
                                   
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 23 Mar 2016 at 6:44PM
I just suffered a loss to trickyknight in a Grunfeld Tournament. I went down in flames in my favorite Smyslov variation vs the Russian System. I knew I was in trouble in the late middle game and probably should have resigned then. I kept hearing "Pull up! Pull up! Pull up!" in my head as my position nose-dived.

[Event "chess_research's mini-tournament LXXVI"]
[Date "2016.03.19"]
[Round "-"]
[White "trickyknight"]
[Black "lordbyron"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2543"]
[BlackElo "2301"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 Nc6 8. Be2 Nd7 9. Be3 Nb6 10. Qc5 Bg4 11. O-O-O f5 12. h3 Bxf3 13. gxf3 e6 14. h4 f4 15. d5 exd5 16. exd5 Ne5 17. Bd4 Ned7 18. Qa3 Bxd4 19. Rxd4 Nf6 20. Kb1 Nfxd5 21. Nxd5 Nxd5 22. h5 c6 23. hxg6 hxg6 24. Bc4 Qf6 25. Re4 Rfd8 26. Rhe1 b5 27. Bb3 Rd6 28. Qa6 Rad8 29. Qxa7 R8d7 30. Qc5 Kg7 31. a3 Nc7 32. Ka2 Kh6 33. Qc1 Rd2 34. Re5 b4 35. axb4 Na6 36. R5e4 c5 37. b5 Nb4+ 38. Kb1 Qd6 39. Rh1+ Kg7 40. Qc3+ Qf6 41. Rhe1 Qxc3 42. bxc3 Nd5 43. Bxd5 R7xd5 44. R1e2 R2d3 45. b6 Rd8 46. Re8 R8d7 47. Rb8 R3d6 48. Kb2 Rc6 49. Ka3 Rcd6 50. Ka4 Kf6 51. b7 1-0


I managed to draw on the white side only because I played the opening the way he did and when he diverged on move 17 with ...Bxf3 instead of ....Bd5 which his opponent had played against him I was able to get into a rook endgame down a pawn and he offered the draw. I gratefully accepted and fled the building. Smiling

[Event "chess_research's mini-tournament LXXVI"]
[Date "2016.03.22"]
[Round "-"]
[White "lordbyron"]
[Black "trickyknight"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2301"]
[BlackElo "2543"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 a6 8. e5 b5 9. Qb3 Nfd7 10. e6 fxe6 11. Be3 Nf6 12. a4 b4 13. Qxb4 Nc6 14. Qa3 Qd6 15. Bc4 Nb4 16. Qb3 Bb7 17. O-O Bxf3 18. Bxe6+ Kh8 19. gxf3 Rab8 20. Ne4 Nxe4 21. fxe4 Bxd4 22. Bxd4+ Qxd4 23. Rad1 Qxe4 24. Qc3+ Rf6 25. Rfe1 Qf4 26. Kh1 Qxf2 27. Bc4 c6 28. Rxe7 Nd5 29. Bxd5 cxd5 30. Rf7 d4 31. Rxf6 Qxf6 32. Qxd4 Qxd4 33. Rxd4 Rxb2 34. Rd6 Kg7 1/2-1/2
                                        
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Grimsweeper on 30 Mar 2016 at 9:01AM
here is my most recent game, the Sicilian has been working for me lately.

[Event "Team match"]
[Site "http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?";]
[Date "2016.03.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "blideo23"]
[Black "baseline"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2417"]
[BlackElo "2430"]
[PlyCount "106"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "1/259200:0"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. O-O
O-O 9. Bf3 Qc7 10. Be3 Nc6 11. Qd2 Nxd4 12. Qxd4 e5 13. Qd2 b5 14. Rad1 Bd7 15.
h3 b4 16. Nd5 Nxd5 17. exd5 Bf6 18. fxe5 Bxe5 19. Bd4 Bxd4+ 20. Qxd4 a5 21. Rc1
Qa7 22. Qxa7 Rxa7 23. c3 bxc3 24. Rxc3 Rb8 25. Rf2 g6 26. g4 Kg7 27. Kg2 Rb4
28. Bd1 f5 29. gxf5 Bxf5 30. Bf3 Rh4 31. Rc6 Rd7 32. Ra6 h5 33. Rxa5 Rf7 34.
Ra6 Rxh3 35. Ra4 g5 36. Rd4 Kg6 37. Bd1 Re3 38. Bc2 Bxc2 39. Rxc2 Rfe7 40. Rf2
Re2 41. Kf1 Rxf2+ 42. Kxf2 h4 43. Rb4 Kh5 44. Rb8 Rf7+ 45. Kg2 Kg4 46. Rb3 Rf4
47. Rc3 Rd4 48. Rc1 h3+ 49. Kf2 Rf4+ 50. Ke3 h2 51. a4 Kh3 52. a5 Rf8 53. b4 g4
0-1
                                             
Re: Candidates Tournament Begins Today
Posted by Robyn Hode on 1 Apr 2016 at 9:43AM
Well played. He played somewhat passively. 15 h3?! Then the endame. Rooks must be active, and yours were!
1st T chess game won
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 3 Mar 2016 at 3:18AM
Rook on F8 protecting queen on F7 and bishop protecting both squares on F and H 6 #10151168
     
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by JohnDerek on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:05AM
Why did he play 19...Kg7
          
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:09AM
I don't know I told the opponent it would been better to take my took and stop the checkmate and only get checked and have a way out
     
Re: 1st T chess game won
Posted by FragileKitty  on 3 Mar 2016 at 4:19AM
Congrats!
Alekhine Solution
Posted by Robyn Hode on 24 Feb 2016 at 1:06PM
For over ten years I have been searching for a solution to this infamous position. Known as the Veronezh Variation, it arises from the 5...cxd6 variation of the Exchange Variation of Alekhine's Defense. Much more common is 5...exd6, but it is so sedate. Smiling

Nedev-Oney
Heraklio 1997

1 e4 Nf6 2 e5 Nd5 3 c4 Nb6 4 d4 d6 5 exd6 cxd6?! 6 Nc3 g6 7 Be3 Bg7 8 Rc1 0-0 9 b3


White has evacuated the fianchettoed Black king's bishop's diagonal and supported the c pawn with the b pawn. In effect, giving Black nothing to bite on. If 9...Nc6?! White can play 10 d5! and Na5 attacking the c pawn looks silly. Black has tried 9...e5, 9...f5 and 9...Bf5.

9...e5?! 10 dxe5 dxe5 11 Qxd8 Rxd8 12 c5! and Black is clearly inferior.
9...f5?! 10 g3!? (10 Nh3!?) e5 11 dxe5 dxd5 12 Qxd8 Rxd8 13 c5! again, Black is clearly inferior.

9...Bf5!? is my main focus. 10 Nf3 d5!?

Btw, Nigel Davies does not have a solution and suggests Black avoid the variation altogether. I refuse! Smiling

Any suggestions would be welcome.
Chess HTH
Posted by Birds of Prey on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:51AM
Any well versed Chess player like to play a game? I just noticed it being here and want to give it a try to see how things are with it. Let me know.
FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Feb 2016 at 10:34AM
https://ratings.fide.com/top.phtml?list=men

There are, unbelievably, 46 players rated at or above 2700. World champion Magnus Carlsen (2844) and Vladimir Kramnik (2801) are over 2800. The United States has three players in the Top 10: Fabiano Caruana (2787), Hikaru Nakamura (2787) and Wesley So (2773).

1Magnus CarlsenNorway2844
2Vladimir KramnikRussia2801
3Anish GiriNetherlands2798
4Levon AronianArmenia2792
5Fabian CaruanaUSA2787
6Hikaru NakamuraUSA2787
7Maxime Vachier-LagraveFrance2785
8Viswanathan AnandIndia2784
9Veselin TopalovBulgaria2780
10Wesley SoUSA2773
     
Re: FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by rabbitoid  on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:34AM
Since the value is relative you have a bootstrap effect which becomes noticeable after a time (a long time).
          
Re: FIDE 2016 February Ratings List
Posted by Robyn Hode on 21 Feb 2016 at 11:38AM
And that's Fabiano Caruana in the list, not Fabian, the 50s teen idol. Smiling
Doubling cube in chess?
Posted by Guanarteme  on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:22AM
I am asking this question about chess, but I could just as easily have asked it about other games. Many years ago, my friend, the late Rick Callaghan (International Correspondence Master, as well as checker player) and I discussed the possibility of a doubling cube in chess. We were trying to avoid interminable games where a player on principle dragged on a lost position. In a multi-game match, a player could double, confronting his opponent with the prospect of losing two points instead of one. That could reduce the number of long drawn out games.

We concluded that we did not like the prospect of a stronger player simply intimidating his opponent into resigning by doubling the stakes in a complex, but even, position.

We also discussed the possibility of allowing players to agree to a result other than 1-0, 0-1 and ½-½ . For example, a player who had a better position where a win was likely, but not certain, could offer his opponent ¼ of a point.

We never tried out these options. though we often played many games in one night and could have done something like that. Has anybody done this or heard of somebody doing it? I am not sure I’d want to, but am curious as to whether it would have worked out as we envisioned it.
     
Re: Doubling cube in chess?
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:44AM
I've never heard of this and I'm against anything that isn't traditional chess but you have a point when it comes to interminable games in lost positions. In some games there comes a point when there is no chance for one player to win, especially if they are much lower rated and it has become clear they are simply dragging the game out till it's final inevitable mate. This is against policy here at GT, but not enforced.

I suspect with these players they will simply accept the double and then do the same thing again.
Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 19 Feb 2016 at 10:50AM
Due to my eyes not being what they once were and the increasingly minuscule print of chess books I have been forced to purchase my chess books in eBook format. More difficult to use, as I expected, but I can still add notes to variations I find useful.

Two recent books I bought and a page from the Scotch book...

     
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by JohnDerek on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:27AM
Where in your opinion is the best site to buy them from ?
          
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 8:39AM
Amazon. Most are priced at $9.99 which is considerably lower than paperback versions at $24.09.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=play+the+slav

Barnes and Noble is much higher priced.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/play-the-slav-james-vigus/1101130466?ean=9781857448948
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 20 Feb 2016 at 10:53AM
These are US prices, of course. I'm not sure how it is in the UK.

You can also add notes quite easily. Here is an example:

          
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by cubs on 22 Feb 2016 at 12:49AM
Smaller city, huge, good store. Wonderful personal service and the best price. No, I don't work there. Tell them Dave sent you...
Rochesster Chess Center
221 Norris Drive
Rochester, NY 14610
1-800-ON-CHESS
(1-800-662-4377)
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by JohnDerek on 22 Feb 2016 at 9:19AM
A bit too far for me to travel !
                    
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Robyn Hode on 22 Feb 2016 at 9:37AM
First travel to Plovdiv. You can go anywhere after that. Smiling
                    
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by cubs on 24 Feb 2016 at 1:20AM
Perhaps you have a telephone... or a computer to look at a web page. If not, they sell both in Phillipopolis.
               
Re: Chess Books in eBook Format
Posted by Grimsweeper on 24 Feb 2016 at 9:55AM
love that place, use to really love the holiday catalogues.
I'm rooting for...
Posted by unbeatable on 18 Feb 2016 at 3:33PM
Mr.Nakamura in the upcoming candidates gathering
Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by Robyn Hode on 16 Feb 2016 at 2:20PM
Excuse my Brooklynese...

A line in the Philidor: 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Bc4. The most common response is 3...Be7 to stop 4 Ng5 with a double attack on f7 (similar to the Two Knights Defense with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6 4 Ng5) except that Black has moved his d pawn instead of his queen's knight.

But what if Black wants to entice White into playing Ng5? How about 3...Nf6 and then 4...Ng5?

Christian Bauer in The Philidor Files gives only the continuation 4...d5 (as in the Two Knights variation) 5 exd5 h6 6 Nf3 e4 7 Qe2 Be7!? 8 Ne5 claiming that White "holds onto his loot" (the captured Black d pawn) in a favorable position.



Does Black have to play Bauer's line? Or can he play 7...Bb4!



In this line Black is ready to 0-0 and then place the rook on e8. A white knight on e5 would no longer be advantageous. Notice also that after 7...Bb4! 8 c3?! Black can 8...0-0 since now 9 cxb4 exf3.

So what can White play in response to 7...Bb4!. Perhaps 8 0-0 0-0 9 Nd4 Re8 or 9...Bc5. In any case this latter position is superior for Black to Bauer's line. White is not as aggressively placed and that advanced Black e pawn causes queenside development problems for White. His setup appears almost artificial.

I agree, I have too much time on my hands. Smiling
     
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by cubs on 16 Feb 2016 at 8:37PM
Or, simply, 3...Be6.
          
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by Robyn Hode on 16 Feb 2016 at 8:56PM
That's possible. Not a very popular response on databases and after 4 Bxe6 fxe6 5 d4 exd4 6 Nxd4 Black's kingside is a little airy and he's down a tempo. I like the other lines better. Just my opinion though.

Bauer says White has the easier game and can play for a f4-f5 lever. But Black appears moderately safe. In the other line Black seems to have the advantage.
               
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 16 Feb 2016 at 10:29PM
Am maybe a rookie but I would castle the king
               
Re: Fun Wit Da Philidor
Posted by cubs on 18 Feb 2016 at 12:03AM
5. d4, Nc6. Try it, You might like it. 6. dxe, dxe. No white minor pieces will arrive any time soon on the d or f files. Two open files. Life is good...
Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 4:51AM
At moment I have 3 the chess apps Chess free which I can choose a difficult setting from practice - 12
Chess tactic pro which gives me 6
Puzzles hard, medium, easy
Chess which shoes me what moves to make.

But I was wondering if there is any other chess app to download
?
     
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 5:25AM
Why do you need 3 more, surely 1 is enough, provided that you can choose the difficulty, and use them Don't play the hard tactic yet, though. And. please, don't use them for a serious game at all!
          
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 6:08AM
Practice makes perfect more I practice I do the better my game
               
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 8:05AM
Agreed! But does two or more apps look more like you couldn't care less about them rather than the other way around? Just a thought, if you like having them all, go for it!
                    
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 8:09AM
I was just wondering both help me out
                         
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by Dionysos  on 9 Feb 2016 at 12:00PM
Both yes, three or more no - does that help you?
                              
Re: Chess apps on Android
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 9 Feb 2016 at 12:02PM
My three apps help me
Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 4 Feb 2016 at 11:01PM
#10098956

What those think constructive criticism only please Smiling
     
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Feb 2016 at 4:10PM
Can you explain the reasoning (why) you played 3...Ba6? You've opened the a8-h1 diagonal and then instead of playing ...Bb7 (or ...e6), you performed a feat of alchemy by changing your bishop on a6 into a doubled pawn. If White had played 4 e5 then ...Nd5 5 c4! Nb6 (5...bxc4 is losing) 6 c5 Nd5 7 Nc3 Bb7 (7...Nxc3 8 bxc3 e6 9 d4) 8 Nxb5 and you have lost a pawn and tempos.

In the game, you have sacrificed your knight on your fifth move for virtually no compensation (weakened dark squares? but the Bg5 remains). You are essentially lost at this point.

If you're just starting out it's best to play something like 1...c5 or 1...e6 against 1 e4. In the opening you are contesting control of the central squares either directly or indirectly. I would not recommend 1...e5 because there are too many ancient traps to fall into.

His blunder is on move 20 a3? (overloading the queen) was compounded with 21 Qxc2?? which leads to mate. If he had played simply 20. Nc3 freeing the rook on a1 to defend the bishop then you would have been down two pieces without compensation.

On the good side, you did see 20...Nxc2!, but 21 Nd2 holds. You win the rook but are still down materially. At that point all four of your remaining pieces are hanging and uncoordinated. Your knight on a1 is out of play, your bishop on a6 blocked by a pawn, the rook is prey to active minor pieces and the queen is busy having tea with her king.

Play the Sicilian of the French defense.
          
Re: Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 5 Feb 2016 at 9:53PM
The knight was sacrificed on 5th move to stop the castle and to move the king out on the board but granted I do need more practice
               
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 5 Feb 2016 at 10:30PM
OK, but you have to weigh the value of the piece. In this case it was not worth sacrificing for a minor positional consideration. You are giving up a piece and all your other pieces are still at home and a long way from taking advantage of White not castling. After 4 Bg5 you could have played h6, in effect asking, "Are you going to take the knight and give me the bishop pair and a half open e file?" Or you could have played c5 to contest the d4 square. If he then plays e5 then you play Nd5 and then possibly Nc7. Knights on c7 and c6 are excellent--you are transposing into a sort of Sicilian setup. You will have to move the bishop back to b7 so you lost a tempo. But your position is playable. Your strategy will be to undermine his center.
Remember, chess has been studied for hundreds of years so there is very little that is new in the opening. Sacrificing a knight on move 5 is dubious. Even the line in the Petroff where white sacs on f7 is not very good. 
                    
Re: Think am improving
Posted by MM David littlefair XI  on 6 Feb 2016 at 1:07AM
Thank you.Smiling
                         
Re: Think am improving
Posted by Robyn Hode on 6 Feb 2016 at 11:21AM
You're welcome David. Smiling

I would recommend 1...e6 against anything. When I was first starting playing in tournaments my mentor suggested I play the Modern Defense (1...g6) and it wasn't right for me. I kept getting steered into Pirc setups or simply bum rushed off the board with pawn rollers. I didn't know how or when to strike back. I decided I needed something more closely related to my current level of understanding. Also, I needed a universal type of opening. Something that was similar in themes no matter what I was facing. So I choose 1...e6.

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5
1 e4 e6 2 f4 d5
1 d4 e6 2 c4 d5
1 c4 e6 2 e4 d5
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5
1 d4 e6 2 Nf3 d5
1 Nf3 e6 2 d4 d5
1 Nf3 e6 2 c4 d5
1 g3 e6 2 Bg2 d5
1 g3 e6 2 c4 d5

Same idea. Support a pawn on d5 with a pawn on e6. Stake a claim in the center of the board. Most of the time you will be playing a French Defense (against 1 e4) or a Queen's Gambit (against 1 d4).

Against the French Defense (1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5) you will see a lot of Exchange (3 exd5 exd5) and Advance Variations (3 e5 c5). To a lesser extent Tarrasch ( 3 Nd2 c5 or Be7 or Nf6) or 3 Nc3 when you can play a Winawer with 3...Bb4 or, as I played back then, a Rubinstein setup with 3...dxe4 4 Nxe4 Nd7. All these lines are solid and not particularly difficult to understand. At first you should select as few variations as possible and become familiar with them.

Against the Queen's Gambit ( 1 d4 e6 2 c4 d5) you'll see many different setups, but it's safe and sound to play 3...Nf6 4...Be7 5...0-0. You can play it against the QG, Catalan, Reti, etc.

Of course you're going to see odd setups. But the system works against anything and because you will be playing it over and over again you will become familiar with the positions. Eventually, you may know more about it than your opponents since you are always seeing these positions!
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by JerNYC on 3 Feb 2016 at 5:29PM
I thought Schreiber did a better job as Spassky than Maguire did as Fischer. But Sarsgaard as the priest confidante was best of all. I wonder if Lombardy's life story would have made for a more interesting movie with his relationship with Fischer as a sub-plot.
     
Re: Pawn Sacrifice
Posted by Grimsweeper on 4 Feb 2016 at 9:05PM
I agree

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